Excellence Strategy

Funded Workshops

Cosmopolitanism as a critique of power? Approaches to another globality in krausismo.

Applicants

Prof. Dr. Claus Dierksmeier

Abstract

How can the global community organize responsibility for its crises and risks, for the global commons, and the opportunities of people worldwide? What should an ecologically, socially and politically responsible globalization look like? - To answer these questions, the workshop will focus on the iberophone tradition of krausismo.

Krausismo is an intellectual movement that came to Latin America from Spain and Portugal in the middle of the 19th century and influenced constitutional law, social policy, international law as well as educational and cultural policy. In terms of content, krausismo goes back to the philosophy of the German philosopher K.C.F. Krause (1781-1832). Krausismo pursues a participatory model of governance according to which the idea of freedom serves not only as the goal but also, and above all, the method of political transformation. Krausists demand, for example, that all those affected by economic relations, legal regulations, or political plans be made directly or representatively involved in their creation.

Encountering the Global? Early Modern Germany, 1450-1850

Applicants

Prof. Dr. Christina Brauner
Prof. Dr. Renate Dürr
Dr. Philip Hahn
Dr. Anne-Sophie Overkamp
Simon Siemianowski

Abstract

That global and local are not opposites has been known not only since the talk of 'glocalisation': Global encounters always take place locally, but global spaces for action are not equally open to everyone. A historical view allows us to inquire into processes of interdependence and disentanglement, but also into the performativity of globalization narratives and thus to further develop non-linear models of description for global processes. While the global history of the early modern period has so far concentrated mainly on the seafaring nations of Western Europe and their global empires, the workshop focuses on a region that is rather marginal in global historical research: the German-speaking areas of Central Europe. The workshop aims to explore the potential of developing a nationally and internationally visible research centre on the 'micro-history of the global' at the University of Tübingen.

„Normativity – Religion – Mobility“

Antragsteller*innen

Prof. Dr. Bernhard Anuth
Prof. Dr. Michael Droege
Prof. Dr. Stephan Dusil

Kurzbeschreibung

Religion is characterized by a common faith conviction of its followers, which requires a certain commitment in order to create community. The respective beliefs have always been shaped and formed in the confrontation with other denominations and/or religions. The project pursues this encounter with the religious other. Using the three thematic fields of inner-religious reactions, normative strategies of action vis-à-vis other religions, and the state's reaction to new religions, it analyses how normativity in the religious sphere changes through contact with other religious beliefs. In this context, various forms of normativity, the scope of action of the actors, and inclusion and exclusion strategies are discussed. The aim is to achieve a deeper understanding of shifts in the normative binding force of religion, which can help, among other things, to reflect on the strategies of action of religions and states, to recognize lines of conflict and to develop strategies for conflict resolution.

Power 2.0? Transformations of power in the age of digitalization

Antragsteller*innen

Dr. Rolf Frankenberger
Prof. Dr. Oliver Schlumberger
Dr. Mirjam Edel
Prof. Michael Butter
Albrecht Raible
PD Dr. Annika Scholl
Prof. Dr. Kai Sassenberg
Prof. Dr. Sonja Utz
Prof. Dr. Ulrike von Luxburg

Kurzbeschreibung

Digitization not only transforms economies, but entire societies and their power relations. While new economic and technological opportunities and challenges are being researched comparatively well, comparatively little attention is being paid to the profound individual and societal, political, cultural and social changes. The Power 2.0 project therefore investigates the foundations, causes and consequences of digital change from a trans- and interdisciplinary perspective. It focuses on transformations of power at the micro, meso and macro levels: in individual behavioral and attitudinal patterns, inter-individual relationships, social media, organizational structures, political regimes, and entire societies. Questions of the nature and scope of power transformations are examined, as well as their consequences for individuals, collectives and entire societies.

Science and university between colonial past, postcolonial present and decolonial future

Antragsteller*innen

Prof. Gabriele Alex
Prof. Bernd Grewe
Jun.‐Prof. Johannes Großmann
Dr. Antony Pattathu
Prof. Thomas Potthast
Prof. Thomas Thiemeyer

Kurzbeschreibung

The discussion about the decolonization of universities, cities and museums has led to a decolonial turn in science in recent years. The approaches developed here complement postcolonial approaches and go beyond them by self-critically questioning the location of the researchers and placing the colonial past in relation to current scientific responsibility. Within the framework of these orientations, a bridge is to be built between scientific demands and civil society responsibility in order to sound out new ways of dealing with the colonial past and the university's postcolonial present. The workshop will also focus on the present and future dimensions of decolonial knowledge production in various disciplines and their research and teaching practice at the university. In particular, the cooperation with civil society actors is to be made fruitful for concepts of a decolonial future of the university.

Un/doing gender, un/doing religion. Local practices of religion and gender in the post-secular world society

Antragsteller*innen

Prof. Dr. Marion Müller
Prof. Dr. Ursula Offenberger
Dr. Jussra Schröer
Prof. Dr. Michael Schüßler
Prof. Fahima Ulfat
Prof. Dr. Birgit Weyel

Kurzbeschreibung

The gender category currently marks a decisive rupture between the normative claim to orientation of religious traditions on the one hand and the diversity of actual life management on the other. Despite the worldwide establishment of gender equality norms, notions of a traditional gender order in the context of (different) religions have proven to be surprisingly persistent. In the (post-)secular world society, too, numerous conflicts have arisen around the issue of "gender and religion". This is true on the national and local level as well as for different religious contexts: In the Catholic Church, for example, women still struggle for access to spiritual offices and leadership functions (Mary 2.0), in the member churches of the EKD there is a dispute about whether same-sex couples may be married or blessed, and there are still debates among traditionally oriented Muslim* women that assume gender inequality.

Against the background of these debates, we are particularly interested in a practical theoretical perspective and the question of how exactly religious and gender affiliation is established in everyday social practices in the first place, overlapping or even mutually neutralizing each other. This is an empirical approach to a question that is often the subject of normative discourse. One could say: Normative, religious concepts are subjected to the stress test of lived life. Questions of theological relevance and hitherto scarcely dealt with in social science research concern the observability of religious practices as social affiliation: What does doing religion mean and what forms of manifestations of religious affiliation are conceivable here or can be observed? On the basis of which characteristics are religious attributions made and to what extent are e.g. ethnic affiliations relevant here? Which religious resources are updated or negated or made irrelevant, and how?

We will discuss all these questions with international speakers from theology and sociology. Already confirmed: Ulrike Auga (HU Berlin), Ali Ghandour (University of Münster), Frank Hillebrandt (Distance University of Hagen), Leyla Jagiella (religious scholar), Saskia Wendel (University of Cologne), Heidemarie Winkel (University of Bielefeld), Monika Wohlrab-Sahr (University of Leipzig).

Studying Diversity after the Reflexive Turn. Timescapes, Populations, Organizations, Collaborations.

Antragsteller*innen

Prof. Dr. Christina Brauner
Dr. Anno Dederichs
Prof. Dr. Boris Nieswand

Kurzbeschreibung

Diversity is a key concept of our time, which oscillates between the description and assessment of the state of society. It promises to provide both an analytical framework for the interpretation of social change and an organisational programme for its management. The aim of the conference is to take up the reflexive turn in the social and cultural sciences in order to make it fruitful for the current debate on diversity. The international and interdisciplinary workshop will focus on (1) timescapes of diversity, (2) forms of population management, (3) the role of diversity programs for organizations, and (4) collaborations across social and ontological boundaries. Following the workshop, perspectives for research cooperation will be discussed and developed.

Decolonizing Global Encounters: Religion – Politics – Culture

Antragsteller*innen

Dr. Floris Biskamp
Prof. Dr. Dorothee Kimmich
Theresa Mayer
Dr. Sebastian Pittl
Prof. Dr. Michael Schüßler
Jun.-Prof. Fahimah Ulfat
Prof. Dr. Birgit Weyel

Kurzbeschreibung

Global Encounters today are determined by multidimensional power and domination relations. Colonial and neo-imperial patterns remain effective even after the formal end of the colonial era and combine to form structures of asymmetrical distribution of resources, life chances and possibilities of shaping. The exploration of these complex interrelationships calls for a deeper transdisciplinary reflection in which the analysis of global dynamics is combined with the critical examination of context-specific constellations. The upcoming challenge is: Decolonizing Global Encounters.

Forum 1 "Decolonizing Religion" questions the role of religion in postcolonial constellations and the (de)colonizing potential of religious discourses and practices. Forum 2 "Decolonizing Politics" examines the conditions and possibilities of decolonizing politics and legal understandings, human rights demands and the complexity and ambivalence of emancipation processes. Forum 3 "Decolonizing Culture" will examine the symbolic structures of religion, politics and economics as well as the mechanisms and preconditions for the production of "meaning", "significance" and "identity" in postcolonial contexts.

Coloniality and Global Encounters in the Culture/History of the Romania

Antragsteller*innen

Dr. Romana Radlwimmer
Dr. Adrian Masters

Kurzbeschreibung

In the early modern period, global networks were created starting from the European Romania. Romanesque forms of government, their literatures and theological tracts met local systems of knowledge, art forms and communities in America, Asia, Africa and Oceania, generating extensive political, philosophical, artistic and ethical debates and new forms of literary and pictorial representation. The interdisciplinary workshop will explore the early modern culture/history of Romania from top-down administrative and religious perspectives as well as from more organic bottom-up perspectives, explore the participation and opposition of non-Romani people and their annulment from the global awareness of the time, and question an oppositional understanding of textual and non-textual worlds and archival systems. Last but not least, colonialism, i.e. the ongoing social and cultural effects of colonization, will be the focus of interest.

Rethinking Well-Being in the Global South: Politics, Imaginaries, and Subjectivities

Antragsteller*innen

Prof. Dr. Sebastian Thies
Dr. Nadja Lobensteiner

Kurzbeschreibung

Well-Being is currently the leading term for a boom in the field of politics, imaginaries and practices in which the fundamental possibilities of shaping the future in the geopolitical power structure between North and South are negotiated. In the workshop we will discuss the concept of Well-Being, which in the Global South is often based on holistic and collective autochthonous ideas, in dialogue with scholars from different regions of the Global South. We will work in an interdisciplinary way and thus enable a systematic approach to Well-Being with regard to the fields of health, education, work, economic prosperity, community participation, cultural creation, spirituality, ethics and sustainability. It will be examined how in the local, regional, national and global interdependencies of the Global South in the selected social fields, the relationship between different models of good living is negotiated and what effects the enforcement or dominance of specific models of good living has on social, cultural and political practice in the fields studied. The aim of the workshop is to examine divergent models of well-being and thus make an innovative contribution to the understanding of the shape of the future in the Global South.

The Emergence of a Shared Super-Value of Climate Protection: Analyzing Legal, Institutional and Societal Responses to a new Global Value Configuration

Antragsteller*innen

Prof. Thomas Diez
Prof. Reinhard Johler
Prof. Jochen von Bernstorff
Prof. Stefan Thomas

Kurzbeschreibung

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Shifting Orders: Belonging in transition

Antragsteller*innen

Dr. Eveline Cioflec
Dr. Niels Weidtmann

Kurzbeschreibung

Traditional and rigid forms of belonging are becoming problematic in an increasingly global society. Their change does not keep pace with the change of society in general. The question, however, is whether and how completely the individual can escape oppressive or constricting affiliations and whether she can only do so if she simultaneously constitutes new forms of belonging. Can belonging and non-belonging be categorically distinguished at all, or do they always already intertwine, so that every form of belonging has an inherent moment of non-belonging, and thus they are rather temporally dynamic structures? By taking a critical look at the dichotomy of belonging and non-belonging, we search for the limits this dichotomy reaches in individual life and action as well as in legislation and human rights. Using the central aspects of (non)-identity, property, and normativity, we explore ways of grasping belonging in transition and ambivalence.