Bachelor thesis

Welcome at our department!

 

In General

Selected aspects of business administration are deepened by writing and presenting a bachelor thesis.
The students work on and analyze a business-related topic specified by the professorship. They use relevant specialist literature to work up the topic. In this context, they learn to deal critically with practical and theoretical questions in the field of research and to evaluate relevant articles. In addition to writing the written work, you present the results by means of a presentation.

Every July, students have to specify at which department they wish to write their B.Sc. thesis in the following academic year. Subsequently, students are centrally allocated to a department for which to write their thesis. Every effort is made to allocate students to the department of their first choice, but this might not always be possible. If you have been allocated to write your thesis at the Department of International Business (DoIB), you will find all necessary information on this website.

If you have been assigned a place in the bachelor seminar at our departmenrt by the examination office, we still ask you to register for the seminar and to name a topic preference.

Key facts

Length: 25 to 30 pages

Presentation: compulsory

Attendance at the Research Methodology seminar: compulsory

Writing period: 10 weeks

Please note: the thesis has to be written in English and there are no exceptions to this rule.

Topics in the winter term 2021/2022

1. The influence of cultural intelligence on global leadership

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

Global leadership refers to the ability to influence the attitudes and behaviours of followers from different cultural backgrounds. A successful global leader should have a vision and purpose, exhibit certain leadership behaviours (e.g. building trust and spanning boundaries) and have a certain skillset in order to achieve their job responsibilities.

A leader’s skills have an important impact on the overall performance of his subordinates. One important characteristic that seems to influence the subordinates’ performance is cultural intelligence (CQ).

Cultural intelligence consists of different meta-cognitive, cognitive, motivational and behavioural components and can be viewed as the ability of a person to adapt to an unfamiliar situation and correctly interpret communication across different cultures.

There is a growing body of literature on global leadership development and as CQ is a feature that can be trained, it becomes of interest for MNCs looking to develop global leaders.

This B.Sc. thesis should critically review the literature on global leadership and cultural intelligence and discuss how cultural intelligence impacts global leadership.

 

Ramsey, JR, Rutti, RM, Lorenz, MP, Barakat, LL & Sant, Anna, AS. 2017. Developing global transformational leaders. Journal of World Business, 52(4), pp. 461–473.

Alon, I & Higgins, JM 2005. Global leadership success through emotional and cultural intelligences. Business Horizons, 48(6), pp. 501–512.

Li, M., Mobley, W. H. and Kelly, A. 2013. When Do Global Leaders Learn Best to Develop Cultural Intelligence? An Investigation of the Moderating Role of Experiential Learning Style. Academy of Management Learning & Education, 12(1), pp. 32–50.

Reiche, B, Bird, A, Mendenhall, M & Osland, J 2017. Contextualizing leadership: a typology of global leadership roles. Journal of International Business Studies, 48(5), pp. 552–572.

2. The significance of cultural intelligence in global virtual teams

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

Global virtual teams have become increasingly important in multinational corporations. Since team members come from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds and hardly meet face to face, they face additional challenges in comparison to co-located teams.

Given the fact, that members of global virtual teams are limited in their exchanges to virtual communication, cultural intelligence is particularly important to overcome the additional challenges in functioning effectively as a team.

Cultural intelligence can be broken down into (meta-)cognitive, motivational and behavioural components and can be viewed as the ability of a person to adapt to an unfamiliar situation and correctly interpret communication across different cultures.

This B.Sc. thesis should critically review the literature on the challenges of global virtual teams and the importance of cultural intelligence for global teams and integrate both streams of literature in a way to tease out the relevance of cultural intelligence for the specific context of global virtual teams.

 

Presbitero, A 2020. Foreign language skill, anxiety, cultural intelligence and individual task performance in global virtual teams: A cognitive perspective. Journal of International Management, 26(2), p. N.PA.

Earley,P.E. , Murnieks, C. , Mosakowski,E. 2007. Cultural Intelligence and the Global Mindset, in Mansour Javidan, Richard M. Steers, Michael A. Hitt (ed.) The Global Mindset (Advances in International Management, Volume 19) Emerald Group Publishing Limited, pp.75 – 103.

Presbitero, A. and Toledano, L. S. 2018. Global team members’ performance and the roles of cross-cultural training, cultural intelligence, and contact intensity: the case of global teams in IT offshoring sector. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 29(14), pp. 2188–2208.

3. Cosmopolitan leaders in multinational corporations

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

Through the emergence of globalization and the new possibilities of mobility, influencing the way business is globally conducted, the topic of cosmopolitanism has recently obtained prominence in the area of international business. Cosmopolitans are attributed with a high degree of openness towards other people, mobility and competence with a foreign culture.

In our globalizing world, companies have an increasing need for global leaders. These leaders are supposed to have certain personal characteristics, such as openness and flexibility. They must address the challenges arising from a workforce of differing nationalities and cultural backgrounds.

This B.Sc. thesis should critically review the literature on cosmopolitans in leadership positions and explore in particular the relevance of cosmopolitan characteristics for successful leadership in MNCs.

 

Zander, L., Mockaitis, A. I. and Butler, C. L. 2012. Leading global teams. Journal of World Business, 47(4), pp. 592–603.

Vogelgesang, G., Clapp-Smith, R., & Osland, J. 2014. The Relationship Between Positive Psychological Capital and Global Mindset in the Context of Global Leadership. Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, 21(2), pp.165–178.

Levy, O, Lee, H-J, Jonsen, K & Peiperl, MA. 2019. Transcultural Brokerage: The Role of Cosmopolitans in Bridging Structural and Cultural Holes. Journal of Management, 45(2), pp. 417–450.

4. An innovative career path: Global careers

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

Employees pursue global careers when they gain diversified, international work experience in several different countries across the world over a longer period of time. These global careers are a particular category of the boundaryless career, in which individuals move between jobs, firms, and countries. As such it is not so much characterizing any single career form, but rather a range of possible career forms which go against many traditional employment assumptions.

The literature still debates what global careerists value most in their careers and what influences their career decisions. Due to the challenging nature of their jobs, global careerists face a multitude of challenges, most notably work-family conflicts. Employing organizations have to take this innovative form of career path into consideration and react to it.

This B.Sc. thesis should critically review the literature on global careerists, providing an overview of their career decisions and challenges and how employing organizations react to this new career form.

 

Suutari, V, Tornikoski, C & Mäkelä, L. 2012. Career decision making of global careerists. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 23(16), pp. 3455–3478.

Näsholm, M. H. 2012. Global careerists’ identity construction: A narrative study of repeat expatriates and international itinerants. International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, 5(4), pp. 804–812.

Mäkelä, L & Suutari, V. 2011. Coping with work-family conflicts in the global career context. Thunderbird International Business Review, 53(3), pp. 365–375.

5. Commonalities and differences of protean and boundaryless careers

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

Protean and boundaryless careers have frequently been described as a result of global economic changes and the increasing international mobility of people. Protean and boundaryless career attitudes are mostly described as alternatives to traditional forms of career planning.

Protean career theory suggests that employees are managing their own careers as a lifelong sequence of work experiences. These experiences are shaped by personal career choices and the search for self- fulfilment. Career choices are based on internal values and self-direction.

The boundaryless career is based on psychological and physical mobility. This concept refers to the willingness to cross organizational and national boundaries as a career strategy.

Despite some similarities between the protean and boundaryless career concepts, they are distinct and are applied varyingly by individuals.

This B.Sc. thesis should critically review the protean and boundaryless career literature and clearly discuss similarities and differences between these two concepts. The dissertation should give practical recommendations how companies can attract and benefit from protean and boundaryless careerists.

 

Breitenmoser, A, Berg, N & Bader, B. 2018. Why does repatriate career success vary? An empirical investigation from both traditional and protean career perspectives. Human Resource Management, 57(5), pp. 1049–1063.

Hofstetter, H & Rosenblatt, Z. 2017. Predicting protean and physical boundaryless career attitudes by work importance and work alternatives: regulatory focus mediation effects. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 28(15), pp. 2136–2158.

Hirschi, A, Jaensch, VK & Herrmann, A. 2017. Protean career orientation, vocational identity, and self-efficacy: an empirical clarification of their relationship. European Journal of Work & Organizational Psychology, 26(2), pp. 208–220.

Crowley, HM, Benson, ET & Al Ariss, A. 2019. Linking Talent Management to Traditional and Boundaryless Career Orientations: Research Propositions and Future Directions. European Management Review, 16(1), pp. 5–19.

6. The impact of national culture on job satisfaction

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

Job satisfaction can be described as the degree to which employees like their jobs. Having satisfied employees is of high relevance for a firm’s success as a low job satisfaction can lead to firm exit, decreased loyalty, neglect of tasks and other less favorable outcomes.

Research suggests that job satisfaction differs across national cultures. However, it is not only the average job satisfaction levels that differ, but the drivers of job satisfaction might also be valued differently across nations. Every culture values different behaviors and role relationships that can influence the importance attached to different job characteristics.

Some drivers of job satisfaction can apply to all countries (e.g. having an interesting job), while others seem to be country-specific (e.g. the relative relevance of pay and job security).

This B.Sc. thesis should critically review the literature on job satisfaction and analyze in which way national culture impacts the drivers and the level of job satisfaction.

 

Hauff, S, Richter, NF & Tressin, T. 2015. Situational job characteristics and job satisfaction: The moderating role of national culture. International Business Review, 24(4), pp. 710–723.

Thomas, DC & Au, K. 2002. The Effect of Cultural Differences on Behavioral Responses to Low Job Satisfaction. Journal of International Business Studies, 33(2), pp. 309–326.

Huang, X & Vliert, EV de. 2004. Level and National Culture as Joint Roots of Job Satisfaction. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 53(3) pp. 329–348.

7. Opportunities and challenges of self-initiated international assignments

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

There is a growing body of research that identifies a disjunction between an international assignees' perception of the value of international assignments from a career perspective and the perceived value from the organizational point of view. Specifically, individual assignees perceive the main value of the assignment as a mean for developing individual competence that can be transferred across organizations.

Reflecting this trend, international human resource managers have noticed a growing number of self-initiated international assignments. In the context of self-initiated assignments, employees seek posts in foreign operations and relocate abroad on their own accord, without organizational assistance. One key implication of the increasing number of self-initiated assignees is that multinational corporations can make use of these employees to fill key positions in subsidiary operations at a lower cost than traditional expatriates.

This B.Sc. thesis should critically review the advantages and drawbacks of self-initiated international assignments, both from the assignee's and the employer's point of view.

 

Suutari, V, Brewster, C, Mäkelä, L, Dickmann, M, & Tornikoski, C. 2018. The Effect of International Work Experience on the Career Success of Expatriates: A Comparison of Assigned and Self‐Initiated Expatriates. Human Resource Management, 57(1), pp. 37-54.

Thomas, D.C., Lazarova, M.B. & Inkson, K. 2005. Global careers: new phenomenon or new perspectives? Journal of World Business, 40(4), pp. 340-347.

Shaffer, M. A.,Reiche, S., Dimitrova, M, Lazarova, M, Chen, S, Westman, M & Wurtz, O 2016. Work- and family-role adjustment of different types of global professionals: Scale development and validation. Journal of International Business Studies, 47(2), pp. 113–139.

Hajro, A.,Stahl, G., Clegg, C. & Lazarova, M.B. 2019. Acculturation, coping, and integration success of international skilled migrants: An integrative review and multilevel framework. Human Resource Management Journal, 29(3), pp. 328–352.

8. The difference between the Western and the Chinese leadership style

Supervisor: Daniel Pauser

Leadership contributes significantly to the success or failure of an organisation. The effects of leadership styles on employees’ motivation and performance have been extensively studied.

Research has shown that the leadership styles considerably differ across cultures. In Western cultures, leadership attributes, such as empowerment and clear vision, are often seen as important elements of good leadership in order to increase employees’ job satisfaction and commitment. On the contrary, in China, leadership tends to be based more on position, authority and seniority as a result of a more rigid hierarchical organisational and societal structure.

The B.Sc. thesis should juxtapose leadership styles in the West and China and critically discuss their advantages and disadvantages.

 

Javidan, M, Dorfman, P, De Luque, M, S, & House, R. 2006. In the eye of the beholder: Cross cultural lessons in leadership from Project GLOBE. Academy of Management Perspectives, 20(1), 67-90.

Gerstner, C. R, & Day, D, D. 1994. Cross-cultural comparison of leadership prototypes. Leadership Quarterly, 5(1), 121-134.

Dorfman, P. W., Howel, J. P.,Hibino, S., Lee, J. K., Tate, U. & Bautista, A. 1997. Leadership in western and Asian countries: Commonalities and differences in effective leadership processes across cultures. Leadership Quarterly, 8(3), 233-274.

Ma, L., Tsui, A.S., 2015. Traditional Chinese philosophies and contemporary leadership. Leadership Quarterly 26, 13–24.

9. The internationalisation of Chinese multinational corporations (MNCs)

Supervisor: Daniel Pauser

Numerous studies investigated the internationalisation strategies of MNCs, specifically the implications of integration and responsiveness strategies.

However, most of these studies have adopted a predominantly Western or developed economy perspective, investigating the internationalisation strategies of American or European MNCs in high-growth regions (e.g. China), neglecting to consider reverse trends.

In light of the ever-increasing significance of Chinese MNCs, research started to focus on internationalisation practices of those Chinese MNCs in developed (e.g. Western) markets.

Dominance, country-of-origin and localisation effects, especially in their interaction with other aspects such as host-country context and industry sector, constitute particularly relevant aspects in the context of internationalisation strategies, specifically regarding the integration and responsiveness of MNCs.

This B.Sc. thesis is targeted at critically analysing how internationalisation strategies, specifically regarding integration and responsiveness, of Chinese MNCs in Western economies are implemented.

 

Zhu, J.S., Zhu, C.J. and De Cieri, H. (2014), Chinese MNCs’ Preparation for Host-Country Labor Relations: An Exploration of Country-of-Origin Effect. Human Resource Management, 53: 947-965.

Pudelko, M. and Harzing, A.-W. (2007), Country-of-origin, localization, or dominance effect? An empirical investigation of HRM practices in foreign subsidiaries. Human Resource Management, 46: 535-559.

Zhong W, Peng J, Liu C. Internationalization performance of Chinese multinational companies in the developed markets. Journal of Business Research. 2013;66(12):2479-2484.

Panibratov, Andrei & Klishevich, Daria. (2021). Emerging market state-owned multinationals: a review and implications for the state capitalism debate. Asian Business & Management. 1-34. 10.1057/s41291-021-00150-6.

10. The different effects of social capital on operations of Chinese multinational corporations (MNCs) in Western countries

Supervisor: Daniel Pauser

Social capital is defined as a nonfinancial resource immanent in social relations that can serve to provide competitive advantage for organisations and individuals alike. It has long since been a prevalent concept extensively covered in management and organisation research.

Previous studies have so far extensively elaborated on a Western-centric perspective analysing the concept’s basic composition (structural, relational, cognitive) and principles regarding for example the positive effect of social capital on information, power, control, influence and solidarity. However, with an increasing shift in focus and an ever-advancing understanding of non-Western management and organisation practices new research avenues have revealed themselves shedding light on the differences in antecedents, mechanisms and overall processes between Chinese and Western manifestations of social capital.

This B.Sc. is aimed at critically discussing the effect of social capital on the operations of Chinse MNCs in Western countries.

 

Zhang, Hongjuan & Han, Rong & Wang, Liang & Lin, Runhui. (2019). Social capital in China: a systematic literature review. Asian Business & Management. 20. 10.1057/s41291-019-00081-3.

Kwon, S. W., & Adler, P. S. (2014). Social capital: Maturation of a field of research. Academy of Management Review, 39(4), 412–422.

Inkpen, A. C., & Tsang, E. W. K. (2016). Reflections on the 2015 decade award—Social capital, networks, and knowledge transfer: An emergent stream of research. Academy of Management Review, 41(4), 573–588.

Hitt, M.A., Lee, Hu. & Yucel, E. The Importance of Social Capital to the Management of Multinational Enterprises: Relational Networks Among Asian and Western Firms. Asia Pacific Journal of Management 19, 353–372 (2002).

11. Trust Repair in Cross-Cultural Collaborations

Supervisor: Canan Liedtke

Trust as a willingness to accept vulnerability is based on the positive expectations of the intensions or behaviour of a counterpart. Given the fact, that expectations are shaped by cultural factors, particular challenges arise within cross-cultural collaborations.

In organizational settings, studies reveal that trust is a highly complex construct with a series of consequences. For instance, trust impacts organisational citizenship behaviours, commitment, job satisfaction and overall performance. However, trust is not static, it is fragile and can be broken or violated. Such violations can lead to retaliation, avoidance, or undesirable work behaviour, and even switch to distrust.

Therefore, trust repair is vital to prevent further damage, resulting in downward spirals, and to re-enable cooperation between the parties. Current research examines the dynamics and effectiveness of trust repair through different approaches on multiple levels. Nevertheless, overarching findings suggest that reasons and response to trust violations, dimensions of trustworthiness and related variables such as expectations and cultural differences affect trust repair efficiency.

The B.Sc. thesis should critically review the literature on trust repair and discuss in particular the impact of culture on trust repair.

 

Kähkönen, T., Blomqvist, K., Gillespie, N., & Vanhala, M. (2021). Employee trust repair: A systematic review of 20 years of empirical research and future research directions. Journal of Business Research, 130, 98–109.

Kim, P. H., Dirks, K. T., & Cooper, C. D. (2009). The Repair of Trust: A Dynamic Bilateral Perspective and Multilevel Conceptualization. Academy of Management Review, 34(3), 401–422.

Zaheer, S., & Zaheer, A. (2005). Trust across borders. Journal of International Business Studies, 37(1), 21–29.

12. Multicultural Employees and Boundary Spanning

Supervisor: Canan Liedtke

Multicultural employees identify with two or more cultures. They possess an internalised cultural understanding of the respective cultures and consequently have a distinct set of features at their disposition that enables them to operate within and between cultures. Research links multicultural employees to higher social capital, intercultural skills and personal well-being to improve intercultural interactions.

In organizational settings, individual boundary spanners engage in and foster relations and interactions between groups. A boundary spanner is defined through the perception of the in-group and relevant out-groups regarding the engagement in significant interactions. The various possible activities of boundary spanning can be bundled into the functions of exchanging, linking, facilitating, and intervening. Particularly individuals with multicultural experience and language skills are identified as boundary spanners in multinational collaborations. Thus, multicultural employees may be pivotal in facilitating boundary spanning in multinational collaborations.

The B.Sc. Thesis should critically review and discuss the literature on multicultural employees, particularly regarding boundary spanning in multinational collaborations and discuss how multicultural employees can facilitate boundary spanning.

 

Backmann, J., Kanitz, R., Tian, A. W., Hoffmann, P., & Hoegl, M. (2020). Cultural gap bridging in multinational teams. Journal of International Business Studies, 51(8), 1283–1311.

Barner-Rasmussen, W., Ehrnrooth, M., Koveshnikov, A., & Mäkelä, K. (2014). Cultural and language skills as resources for boundary spanning within the MNC. Journal of International Business Studies, 45(7), 886–905.

Fitzsimmons, S. R., Liao, Y., & Thomas, D. C. (2016). From crossing cultures to straddling them: An empirical examination of outcomes for multicultural employees. Journal of International Business Studies, 48(1), 63–89.

Mäkelä, K., Barner-Rasmussen, W., Ehrnrooth, M., & Koveshnikov, A. (2019). Potential and recognized boundary spanners in multinational corporations. Journal of World Business, 54(4), 335–349.

Topics in the winter term 2021/2022

1. The influence of cultural intelligence on global leadership

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

Global leadership refers to the ability to influence the attitudes and behaviours of followers from different cultural backgrounds. A successful global leader should have a vision and purpose, exhibit certain leadership behaviours (e.g. building trust and spanning boundaries) and have a certain skillset in order to achieve their job responsibilities.

A leader’s skills have an important impact on the overall performance of his subordinates. One important characteristic that seems to influence the subordinates’ performance is cultural intelligence (CQ).

Cultural intelligence consists of different meta-cognitive, cognitive, motivational and behavioural components and can be viewed as the ability of a person to adapt to an unfamiliar situation and correctly interpret communication across different cultures.

There is a growing body of literature on global leadership development and as CQ is a feature that can be trained, it becomes of interest for MNCs looking to develop global leaders.

This B.Sc. thesis should critically review the literature on global leadership and cultural intelligence and discuss how cultural intelligence impacts global leadership.

 

Ramsey, JR, Rutti, RM, Lorenz, MP, Barakat, LL & Sant, Anna, AS. 2017. Developing global transformational leaders. Journal of World Business, 52(4), pp. 461–473.

Alon, I & Higgins, JM 2005. Global leadership success through emotional and cultural intelligences. Business Horizons, 48(6), pp. 501–512.

Li, M., Mobley, W. H. and Kelly, A. 2013. When Do Global Leaders Learn Best to Develop Cultural Intelligence? An Investigation of the Moderating Role of Experiential Learning Style. Academy of Management Learning & Education, 12(1), pp. 32–50.

Reiche, B, Bird, A, Mendenhall, M & Osland, J 2017. Contextualizing leadership: a typology of global leadership roles. Journal of International Business Studies, 48(5), pp. 552–572.

2. The significance of cultural intelligence in global virtual teams

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

Global virtual teams have become increasingly important in multinational corporations. Since team members come from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds and hardly meet face to face, they face additional challenges in comparison to co-located teams.

Given the fact, that members of global virtual teams are limited in their exchanges to virtual communication, cultural intelligence is particularly important to overcome the additional challenges in functioning effectively as a team.

Cultural intelligence can be broken down into (meta-)cognitive, motivational and behavioural components and can be viewed as the ability of a person to adapt to an unfamiliar situation and correctly interpret communication across different cultures.

This B.Sc. thesis should critically review the literature on the challenges of global virtual teams and the importance of cultural intelligence for global teams and integrate both streams of literature in a way to tease out the relevance of cultural intelligence for the specific context of global virtual teams.

 

Presbitero, A 2020. Foreign language skill, anxiety, cultural intelligence and individual task performance in global virtual teams: A cognitive perspective. Journal of International Management, 26(2), p. N.PA.

Earley,P.E. , Murnieks, C. , Mosakowski,E. 2007. Cultural Intelligence and the Global Mindset, in Mansour Javidan, Richard M. Steers, Michael A. Hitt (ed.) The Global Mindset (Advances in International Management, Volume 19) Emerald Group Publishing Limited, pp.75 – 103.

Presbitero, A. and Toledano, L. S. 2018. Global team members’ performance and the roles of cross-cultural training, cultural intelligence, and contact intensity: the case of global teams in IT offshoring sector. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 29(14), pp. 2188–2208.

3. Cosmopolitan leaders in multinational corporations

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

Through the emergence of globalization and the new possibilities of mobility, influencing the way business is globally conducted, the topic of cosmopolitanism has recently obtained prominence in the area of international business. Cosmopolitans are attributed with a high degree of openness towards other people, mobility and competence with a foreign culture.

In our globalizing world, companies have an increasing need for global leaders. These leaders are supposed to have certain personal characteristics, such as openness and flexibility. They must address the challenges arising from a workforce of differing nationalities and cultural backgrounds.

This B.Sc. thesis should critically review the literature on cosmopolitans in leadership positions and explore in particular the relevance of cosmopolitan characteristics for successful leadership in MNCs.

 

Zander, L., Mockaitis, A. I. and Butler, C. L. 2012. Leading global teams. Journal of World Business, 47(4), pp. 592–603.

Vogelgesang, G., Clapp-Smith, R., & Osland, J. 2014. The Relationship Between Positive Psychological Capital and Global Mindset in the Context of Global Leadership. Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, 21(2), pp.165–178.

Levy, O, Lee, H-J, Jonsen, K & Peiperl, MA. 2019. Transcultural Brokerage: The Role of Cosmopolitans in Bridging Structural and Cultural Holes. Journal of Management, 45(2), pp. 417–450.

4. An innovative career path: Global careers

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

Employees pursue global careers when they gain diversified, international work experience in several different countries across the world over a longer period of time. These global careers are a particular category of the boundaryless career, in which individuals move between jobs, firms, and countries. As such it is not so much characterizing any single career form, but rather a range of possible career forms which go against many traditional employment assumptions.

The literature still debates what global careerists value most in their careers and what influences their career decisions. Due to the challenging nature of their jobs, global careerists face a multitude of challenges, most notably work-family conflicts. Employing organizations have to take this innovative form of career path into consideration and react to it.

This B.Sc. thesis should critically review the literature on global careerists, providing an overview of their career decisions and challenges and how employing organizations react to this new career form.

 

Suutari, V, Tornikoski, C & Mäkelä, L. 2012. Career decision making of global careerists. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 23(16), pp. 3455–3478.

Näsholm, M. H. 2012. Global careerists’ identity construction: A narrative study of repeat expatriates and international itinerants. International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, 5(4), pp. 804–812.

Mäkelä, L & Suutari, V. 2011. Coping with work-family conflicts in the global career context. Thunderbird International Business Review, 53(3), pp. 365–375.

5. Commonalities and differences of protean and boundaryless careers

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

Protean and boundaryless careers have frequently been described as a result of global economic changes and the increasing international mobility of people. Protean and boundaryless career attitudes are mostly described as alternatives to traditional forms of career planning.

Protean career theory suggests that employees are managing their own careers as a lifelong sequence of work experiences. These experiences are shaped by personal career choices and the search for self- fulfilment. Career choices are based on internal values and self-direction.

The boundaryless career is based on psychological and physical mobility. This concept refers to the willingness to cross organizational and national boundaries as a career strategy.

Despite some similarities between the protean and boundaryless career concepts, they are distinct and are applied varyingly by individuals.

This B.Sc. thesis should critically review the protean and boundaryless career literature and clearly discuss similarities and differences between these two concepts. The dissertation should give practical recommendations how companies can attract and benefit from protean and boundaryless careerists.

 

Breitenmoser, A, Berg, N & Bader, B. 2018. Why does repatriate career success vary? An empirical investigation from both traditional and protean career perspectives. Human Resource Management, 57(5), pp. 1049–1063.

Hofstetter, H & Rosenblatt, Z. 2017. Predicting protean and physical boundaryless career attitudes by work importance and work alternatives: regulatory focus mediation effects. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 28(15), pp. 2136–2158.

Hirschi, A, Jaensch, VK & Herrmann, A. 2017. Protean career orientation, vocational identity, and self-efficacy: an empirical clarification of their relationship. European Journal of Work & Organizational Psychology, 26(2), pp. 208–220.

Crowley, HM, Benson, ET & Al Ariss, A. 2019. Linking Talent Management to Traditional and Boundaryless Career Orientations: Research Propositions and Future Directions. European Management Review, 16(1), pp. 5–19.

6. The impact of national culture on job satisfaction

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

Job satisfaction can be described as the degree to which employees like their jobs. Having satisfied employees is of high relevance for a firm’s success as a low job satisfaction can lead to firm exit, decreased loyalty, neglect of tasks and other less favorable outcomes.

Research suggests that job satisfaction differs across national cultures. However, it is not only the average job satisfaction levels that differ, but the drivers of job satisfaction might also be valued differently across nations. Every culture values different behaviors and role relationships that can influence the importance attached to different job characteristics.

Some drivers of job satisfaction can apply to all countries (e.g. having an interesting job), while others seem to be country-specific (e.g. the relative relevance of pay and job security).

This B.Sc. thesis should critically review the literature on job satisfaction and analyze in which way national culture impacts the drivers and the level of job satisfaction.

 

Hauff, S, Richter, NF & Tressin, T. 2015. Situational job characteristics and job satisfaction: The moderating role of national culture. International Business Review, 24(4), pp. 710–723.

Thomas, DC & Au, K. 2002. The Effect of Cultural Differences on Behavioral Responses to Low Job Satisfaction. Journal of International Business Studies, 33(2), pp. 309–326.

Huang, X & Vliert, EV de. 2004. Level and National Culture as Joint Roots of Job Satisfaction. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 53(3) pp. 329–348.

7. Opportunities and challenges of self-initiated international assignments

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

There is a growing body of research that identifies a disjunction between an international assignees' perception of the value of international assignments from a career perspective and the perceived value from the organizational point of view. Specifically, individual assignees perceive the main value of the assignment as a mean for developing individual competence that can be transferred across organizations.

Reflecting this trend, international human resource managers have noticed a growing number of self-initiated international assignments. In the context of self-initiated assignments, employees seek posts in foreign operations and relocate abroad on their own accord, without organizational assistance. One key implication of the increasing number of self-initiated assignees is that multinational corporations can make use of these employees to fill key positions in subsidiary operations at a lower cost than traditional expatriates.

This B.Sc. thesis should critically review the advantages and drawbacks of self-initiated international assignments, both from the assignee's and the employer's point of view.

 

Suutari, V, Brewster, C, Mäkelä, L, Dickmann, M, & Tornikoski, C. 2018. The Effect of International Work Experience on the Career Success of Expatriates: A Comparison of Assigned and Self‐Initiated Expatriates. Human Resource Management, 57(1), pp. 37-54.

Thomas, D.C., Lazarova, M.B. & Inkson, K. 2005. Global careers: new phenomenon or new perspectives? Journal of World Business, 40(4), pp. 340-347.

Shaffer, M. A.,Reiche, S., Dimitrova, M, Lazarova, M, Chen, S, Westman, M & Wurtz, O 2016. Work- and family-role adjustment of different types of global professionals: Scale development and validation. Journal of International Business Studies, 47(2), pp. 113–139.

Hajro, A.,Stahl, G., Clegg, C. & Lazarova, M.B. 2019. Acculturation, coping, and integration success of international skilled migrants: An integrative review and multilevel framework. Human Resource Management Journal, 29(3), pp. 328–352.

8.

Supervisor:  Daniel Pauser

9.

Supervisor:  Daniel Pauser

10.

Supervisor:  Daniel Pauser

11.
12.

Topics summer term 2021

1. Opportunities and challenges of global virtual teams

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer
Virtual teams are geographically dispersed, requiring their members to collaborate virtually, i.e., through electronic means with minimal face-to-face interaction. Often, virtual teams consist of cross-functional members working on highly interdependent tasks and sharing responsibility for team outcomes.

Multinational corporations use global virtual teams as they are time- and cost-effective and allow to use the best employees available globally for a given task. Furthermore, diversity in teams has been found to increase creativity and performance. However, the virtual context and diversity of these teams also present significant challenges.

Individuals tend to think in categories: one tends to classify people according to various social categories, identifying with a certain social group (ingroup) and distancing oneself from others (outgroups) A culturally diverse environment thus can have negative effects on the functioning of multinational teams. This becomes particularly crucial in virtual teams, a context in which categorization-based stereotyping cannot be overcome through face-to-face encounters. In the absence of the possibility of having face-to-face meetings, global virtual teams rely on electronic communication media to coordinate their collaboration. To facilitate the choice between telephone, video conference, emails, chat, and integrated communication systems, several influential media choice theories have attempted to identify the optimal media for specific team tasks.

This B.Sc. thesis should critically review the literature on the opportunities and challenges of global virtual teams and how to mitigate these.

Hambley, L. A., O’Neill, T. A. & Leine, T. J. B. 2007. Virtual team leadership: The effects of leadership style and communication medium on team interaction styles and outcomes. Organizational Behavior & Human Decision Processes, 103 (1), pp. 1-20

Tenzer, H. and Pudelko, M. 2016. Media choice in multilingual virtual teams. Journal of International Business Studies, 47(4), pp. 427–452.

Presbitero, A. and Toledano, L. S. 2018. Global team members’ performance and the roles of cross-cultural training, cultural intelligence, and contact intensity: the case of global teams in IT offshoring sector.  International Journal of Human Resource Management, 29(14), pp. 2188–2208.

2. The challenges of effective virtual team leadership

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

Virtual teams are geographically dispersed, requiring their members to collaborate through electronic means with minimal face-to-face interaction. Often, virtual teams consist of cross-functional members, working on highly interdependent tasks and sharing responsibility for team outcomes. However, the unique characteristics of virtual teams make the sharing of knowledge among the geographically separated members difficult. Individuals face additional challenges when interacting in virtual teams, such as lack of trust, group cohesion, satisfaction and increased potential for conflict.

Virtual teams present unique leadership challenges as the leader is confronted with the challenge of geographic dispersion. Organizations need to select leaders who can articulate a vision that guide team members and motivate them.

This Bachelor thesis should critically discuss whether and how traditional leadership styles have to be adapted for effective leadership in global virtual teams.

Hambley, L. A., O’Neill, T. A. & Leine, T. J. B., 2007. Virtual team leadership: The effects of leadership style and communication medium on team interaction styles and outcomes. Organizational Behavior & Human Decision Processes, 103 (1), pp. 1-20.

Kahai, S. S., Sosik, J. J. & Avolio, B. J., 2003. Effects of leadership style, anonymity and rewards on creativity- relevant processes and outcomes in an electronic meeting system context. The Leadership Quarterly, 14 (4/5), pp. 499-524.

Muethel, M. & Hoegl, M., 2010. Cultural and societal influences on shared leadership in globally dispersed teams. Journal of International Management, 16 (3), pp. 234-246.

3. Opportunities and challenges of cosmopolitan employees in multinational corporations

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

Through the emergence of globalization and new possibilities of mobility, influencing the way business is globally conducted, the topic of cosmopolitanism has recently obtained prominence in the area of international business. Cosmopolitans are attributed with a high degree of openness towards other people, mobility and competence with a foreign culture. Additionally, cosmopolitans are said to have a high degree of cultural intelligence and are equipped with a global mindset.

A multinational corporation is an organization which transcends its home country with its worldwide business activities and usually has subsidiaries in many different foreign countries. Multinational corporations presently face many challenges due to a changing environment. One group of employees which might help them to navigate these challenges are cosmopolitans, as they can serve as boundary spanners or bridge makers in multinational teams, transfer knowledge or negotiate across cultural boundaries or act as global leaders.

This Bachelor thesis should critically review the literature on cosmopolitans and discuss in which way they present opportunities and challenges to multinational corporations.

Skovgaard-Smith, I., & Poulfelt, F. 2018. Imagining ‘non-nationality’: Cosmopolitanism as a source of identity and belonging. Human Relations, 71(2), pp. 129–154.

Levy, O, Lee, H-J, Jonsen, K & Peiperl, MA 2019. Transcultural Brokerage: The Role of Cosmopolitans in Bridging Structural and Cultural Holes. Journal of Management, 45(2), pp. 417–450.

Vogelgesang Lester, G, Clapp, SR, Yunlu, D & James, A. 2019. Attention! Cosmopolitans ahead – They may not be as creative as they think!. Creativity & Innovation Management, 28(2), pp. 240–249.

4. Cosmopolitan expatriates

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

Research on expatriation has been a popular topic in international business for more than four decades. Given the increasing amount of expatriate assignments in an increasingly international business environment, the issue of how expatriates adjust to foreign cultures and perform in their jobs has become increasingly important.

As expatriate failure has negative consequences both for the organization and the expatriate, selecting the right candidate for an international assignment is of high importance.

One group that appears to have particular capabilities to overcome the challenges of expatriation are cosmopolitans. They are credited with a certain degree of openness towards other people, mobility and competence with a foreign culture.

This Bachelor thesis should critically review the literature on cosmopolitans in expatriate positions and explore in particular the relevance of cosmopolitan characteristics for a successful expatriation period.

Skovgaard-Smith, I., & Poulfelt, F. 2018. Imagining ‘non-nationality’: Cosmopolitanism as a source of identity and belonging. Human Relations, 71(2), pp. 129–154.

Grinstein, A. and Wathieu, L. 2012. Happily (mal)adjusted: Cosmopolitan identity and expatriate adjustment. International Journal of Research in Marketing, 29(4), pp. 337–345

Shaffer, M.A., Harrison, D.A. & Gilley, K.M., 1999. Dimensions, determinants and differences in the expatriate adjustment process. Journal of International Business Studies, 30(3), pp. 557-582.

5. Cross-cultural training and development of expatriates

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

In an effort to attain and sustain global competitiveness, organizations are increasingly focused on developing the necessary skills for success in the international marketplace. Expatriation can help MNCs manage the complexity of international business and provides the possibility to control and coordinate subsidiaries. Additionally, Expatriation is a tool used in staffing, as e.g. different subsidiaries face a shortage of skilled employees or in order to develop a pool of experienced international talent.

However, lack of proper adjustment of an expatriate can result in poor work performance with associated issues of major disadvantages for both, the company and the expatriate. Therefore, there has been a growing trend within multinational corporations to provide cross-cultural management training for their expatriates, in order to increase the effectiveness of their employees working and living outside of their own cultures.

Cross-cultural training facilitates the expatriate’s cross-cultural adjustment in the host country and, hence, minimizes problems of adjustment. Cross-cultural training helps to develop a more cosmopolitan outlook and gives managers a deeper understanding and appreciation of cross-cultural situations. It also can help employees to learn about the host culture, its values and norms, as well as appropriate and acceptable behaviors in the society and how that affects their performance in host organizations. Furthermore, it helps develop coping mechanisms to deal with new and unforeseen or unpredictable events in the host culture and to reduce conflict arising from new unexpected and unfamiliar encounters.

This B.Sc. thesis should critically discuss how cross-cultural training and development can help improve the expatriates’ adjustment process.

Lenartowicz, T., Johnson, J. P. and Konopaske, R. 2014.The application of learning theories to improve cross-cultural training programs in MNCs.International Journal of Human Resource Management, 25(12), pp. 1697–1719.

Bennett, R., Aston, A., & Colquhoun, T. 2000. Crosscultural training: A critical step in ensuring the success of international assignments. Human Resource Management, 39(23), pp. 239-250.

Puck, J, Kittler, M, & Wright, C. 2008. Does it really work? Re-assessing the impact of pre-departure cross- cultural training on expatriate adjustment. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 19(12), pp. 2182-2197.

Forster, N. 2000. Expatriates and the impact of crosscultural training. Human Resource Management Journal, 10(3), pp. 63-78.

6. Expatriation and career progression

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

Research on expatriation has been a popular topic in international business for more than four decades. Given the increasing amount of expatriate assignments in an increasingly international business environment, the issue of what motivates potential expatriates to go abroad and perform in their jobs has become increasingly important.

One factor that is often mentioned in regards to expatriation willingness is the perceived probability of a promotion after a successful expatriation. However, these hopes are not always fulfilled due to a number of problems ranging from expatriate failure to organizational planning.

This B.Sc. thesis should critically review the actual and perceived outcomes of expatriation on an individual’s career progression.

Froese, F. J., Jommersbach, S. and Klautzsch, E. 2013. Cosmopolitan career choices: a cross-cultural study of job candidates’ expatriation willingness. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 24(17), pp. 3247–3261.

Georgakakis, D., Dauth, T. and Ruigrok, W. 2016. Too much of a good thing: Does international experience variety accelerate or delay executives’ career advancement?. Journal of World Business, 51(3), pp. 425–437.

Benson, G. S. and Pattie, M. 2008. Is expatriation good for my career? The impact of expatriate assignments on perceived and actual career outcomes. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 19(9), pp. 1636–1653.

Suutari, V., Tornikoski, C. and Mäkelä, L. 2012. Career decision making of global careerists’, International Journal of Human Resource Management, 23(16), pp. 3455–3478.

7. Cultural intelligence and its impact on the willingness and success for expatriation

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

Research on expatriation has been a popular topic in international business for more than four decades. Given the increasing amount of expatriate assignments in an increasingly international business environment, the issue of how expatriates adjust to foreign cultures and perform in their jobs has become increasingly important. As expatriate failure has negative consequences both for the organization and the expatriate, selecting the right candidate for an international assignment is of high importance.

One characteristic that appears to contribute to overcoming the challenges of expatriation is cultural intelligence. Cultural intelligence consists of different (meta-)cognitive, motivational and behavioural components and can be viewed as the ability of a person to adapt to an unfamiliar situation and correctly interpret communication across different cultures.

This B.Sc. thesis should critically review the literature on cultural intelligence in the context of expatriation and explore in particular the relevance of cultural intelligence on the willingness to take on an international assignment and its influence on a successful expatriation period.

Earley,P.E., Murnieks,C., Mosakowski,E. 2007.Cultural Intelligence and the Global Mindset, in Mansour Javidan, Richard M. Steers, Michael A. Hitt (ed.) The Global Mindset (Advances in International Management, Volume 19). Emerald Group Publishing Limited, pp.75 –103

Hippler, T., Caligiuri, P. & Johnson, J. 2014. Revisiting the construct of expatriate adjustment. International Studies of Management & Organization, 44(3), pp. 8-24

Lee, L.-Y. and Sukoco, B. M. 2010. The effects of cultural intelligence on expatriate performance: the moderating effects of international experience. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 21(7), pp. 963–981.

Huff, K. C. 2013. Language, cultural intelligence and expatriate success. Management Research Review, 36(6), pp. 596–612.

8. The impact of family adjustment and conflict on expatriate success

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

Research on expatriation has been a popular topic in international business for more than four decades. Given the increasing amount of expatriate assignments in an increasingly international business environment, the issue of how expatriates adjust to foreign cultures and perform in their jobs has become increasingly important.

One factor contributing to expatriate failure that has been discussed in the literature is spousal and family adjustment and conflict within the host country. The adjustment of the family and spouse can have a significant impact on the success of an international assignment and thus should not be neglected by organizations.

Another factor to consider is the willingness to go on an expatriation assignment as the demand for expatriates increases, but potential expatriates might show resistance to international assignments due to family concerns. In recent years the literature has started to discuss dual career expatriates besides the traditional trailing spouses.

This B.Sc. thesis should critically discuss the literature on the expatriate’s family and spouse, highlight the relevance family adjustment can have on the success of international assignments and what multinational enterprises can do to address this problem.

Caligiuri, P. M. et al. 1998. Testing a Theoretical Model for Examining the Relationship Between Family Adjustment and Expatriates’ Work Adjustment’. Journal of Applied Psychology, 83(4), pp. 598–614.

Takeuchi, R., Seakhwa Yun, R. and Tesluk, P. E. 2002. An Examination of Crossover and Spillover Effects of Spousal and Expatriate Cross-Cultural Adjustment on Expatriate Outcomes. Journal of Applied Psychology, 87(4), pp. 655–666.

Shaffer, M. A. et al. 2016. Work- and family-role adjustment of different types of global professionals: Scale development and validation. Journal of International Business Studies, 47(2), pp. 113–139.

Känsälä, M., Mäkelä, L. and Suutari, V. 2015. Career coordination strategies among dual career expatriate couples. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 26(17), pp. 2187–2210.

9. Culturally diverse teams and their performance

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

Multinational teams have become more and more important for multinational companies due to their ability to integrate a variety of perspectives and skills. However, the cultural diversity between team members confronts these teams with a range of challenges. For example, they need to manage conflicts across members’ national cultural boundaries, deal with coordination and control issues, maintain communication richness, and develop and uphold team cohesiveness. For multicultural teams to be effective, members must learn to address these challenges arising from team members’ differing nationalities and cultural backgrounds.

Despite these challenges, some scholars argue that the differences in cultures and the diversity in resulting perspectives within a multinational team can also contribute to their performance, for instance by increasing team creativity and reducing groupthink.

This Bachelor thesis should critically review the positive and negative effects of cultural diversity on team performance and provide recommendations how to effectively manage this diversity within a multinational team.

Pieterse, A. N., Van Knippenberg, D., & Van Dierendonck, D. 2013. Cultural diversity and team performance: The role of team member goal orientation. Academy of Management Journal, 56(3), pp. 782-804.

Stahl, G.K., Maznevski, M.L. 2021. Unraveling the effects of cultural diversity in teams: A retrospective of research on multicultural work groups and an agenda for future research. Journal of International Business Studies, 52, pp. 4–22.

Lattimer, R. L. 1998. The case for diversity in global business, and the impact of diversity on team performance. Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, 8(2), pp. 3-17.

10. Language barriers in multinational teams

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

Multinational teams are work-teams consisting of members of different nationalities and cultures. They have become more and more important for multinational companies due to their ability to integrate a variety of perspectives and skills. These multinational teams need to manage conflicts, deal with coordination and control issues, maintain communication richness, develop, and uphold team cohesiveness, as well as deal with the team task at hand.

However, not only the cultural but also the linguistic diversity between team members confronts these teams with a range of challenges. Their different mother tongues and differing levels of foreign language abilities result in communication barriers. For example, a low level of language proficiency can be interpreted by fellow team members as a lack of competence, thus creating tension within the team. Furthermore, language barriers can impact knowledge processing, power dynamics and trust dynamics in teams.

This Bachelor thesis should critically review the literature on language barriers in multinational teams and discuss which impact language barriers can have on multinational teamwork.

Li, Huisi (Jessica), Y. Connie Yuan, Natalya N. Bazarova, and Bradford S. Bell. 2019. Talk and Let Talk: The Effects of Language Proficiency on Speaking Up and Competence Perceptions in Multinational Teams. Group & Organization Management, 44 (5), pp. 953–89.

Tenzer, H, Pudelko, M & Zellmer-Bruhn, M. 2021. The impact of language barriers on knowledge processing in multinational teams. Journal of World Business, 56(2), p. N.PAG.

Tenzer, H & Pudelko, M. 2017. The influence of language differences on power dynamics in multinational teams. Journal of World Business, 52(1), pp. 45–61.

Nurmi, N & Koroma, J. 2020. The emotional benefits and performance costs of building a psychologically safe language climate in MNCs. Journal of World Business, 55(4), p. N.PAG.

11. The impact of language barriers on knowledge management in multinational corporations

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

The competitive advantage of a multinational corporation increasingly depends on its ability to promote worldwide learning and innovation. To exploit innovations, the knowledge developed in one location of the organization must be made available to other organizational entities at locations across the globe. This inherently complex process is impeded by the fact that multinational organizations are at the same time multilingual organizations.

Many top managers and scholars alike still see language as a neutral code which can be easily managed by introducing a common corporate language. Holding this “instrumental” view of language, they fail to recognize more implicit barriers of language differences for corporate knowledge transfer.

This Bachelor thesis should integrate the findings of this emerging research area by providing a structured overview of the multiple linguistic challenges to knowledge transfer in large multinationals. On this basis, recommendations for corporate language policies should be formulated.

Barner-Rasmussen, W. & Björkman, I. 2005. Surmounting interunit barriers: factors associated with interunit communication intensity in the multinational corporation. International Studies of Management and Organization, Special issue, 35(1), pp. 28-46.

Marschan-Piekkari, R., Welch, D.E. & Welch, L.S. 1999. In the shadow: the impact of language on structure, power and communication in the multinational. International Business Review, 8(4), pp. 421-40.

Welch, D.E. & Welch, L.S. 2008. The importance of language in international knowledge transfer. Management International Review, 48(3), pp. 339-360.

12. Highly skilled migrants in the workplace

Supervisor: Andrea Hauer

In business research the global work experience has been heavily focus on expatriates. Expatriates are a subcategory of migrants, but their experience is not representative of the broader migrant population. Global migration has become an unquestionable reality of today’s societies. As most migration studies focus on low skilled migrants, there is an obvious neglect of research on highly skilled migrants, especially given that more than one in four migrants moving into the G20 economies holds at least a tertiary education degree.

Only recently research has started to focus on highly skilled migrants those and their implications for international business. Initial prior research already suggested that higher educational levels could be associated with lower adaptation stress of migrants and with a higher degree of identification with the host country.

Besides educational level, generational status also influences the adaptation of migrants. In many countries, migrants show a high tendency to become entrepreneurs, which has often been ascribed to discrimination, ethnic networks, and sociodemographic differences. Some studies even suggest that some migrants self-selectively have a entrepreneurial personality. Other highly skilled migrants who choose to work within an already established organization experience occupational downgrading, which leads these employees through a sensemaking process to connect their experiences in the workplace with their identity.

This Bachelor thesis should critically review the literature on highly skilled migrants in the workplace and in particular highlight the reasons behind their differing workplace experiences.

Hajro, A, Caprar, DV, Zikic, J & Stahl, GK., 2021. Global migrants: Understanding the implications for international business and management. Journal of World Business, 56(2), p. N.PAG

Simon, B. and Ruhs, D., 2008. Identity and politicization among Turkish migrants in Germany: the role of dual identification. Journal of personality and social psychology, 95(6), p.1354.

Bakker, W., Van Der Zee, K. and Van Oudenhoven, J.P., 2006. Personality and Dutch emigrants' reactions to acculturation strategies. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 36(12), pp.2864-2891.

Vandor, P 2021. Are voluntary international migrants self-selected for entrepreneurship? An analysis of entrepreneurial personality traits. Journal of World Business, 56(2), p. N.PAG

Fernando, D & Patriotta, G 2020. “Us versus them”: Sensemaking and identity processes in skilled migrants’ experiences of occupational downgrading. Journal of World Business, 55(4), p. N.PAG

13. Distrust in an International Context

Supervisor: Canan Liedtke

Trust is for organizations as fragile as it is important. Obtaining trust in business relationships between people of the same culture is already difficult to build. In international interactions, it is even more difficult.

For organizations, the emergence of distrust entails, by contrast, negative and costly consequences. It can lead to negative relationships and even intractable conflicts and ultimately cause lower productivity and performance.

Recent research has shown that trust and distrust are distinct constructs. Distrust is self-amplifying and represses trust.  While trust is slowly built and can be quickly shattered, distrust emerges quicker but can be difficult to mitigate.

The B.Sc. thesis should critically review the literature on the consequences of distrust and discuss how challenges arising from cultural differences can either mitigate trust or increase distrust on an interpersonal level in international business.

Kim, P. H., Dirks, K. T., & Cooper, C. D. (2009). The Repair of Trust: A Dynamic Bilateral Perspective and Multilevel Conceptualization. Academy of Management Review, 34(3), 401–422.

Saunders, M. N. K., Dietz, G., & Thornhill, A. (2014). Trust and distrust: Polar opposites, or independent but co-existing? Human Relations, 67(6), 639–665.

Zaheer, S., & Zaheer, A. (2005). Trust across borders. Journal of International Business Studies, 37(1), 21–29.

14. Cross-cultural Responses to Organizational Injustice

Supervisor: Canan Liedtke

The belief of being treated unfairly leads individuals to engage in different behavioral responses. The literature distinguishes between antisocial and prosocial approaches.  Antisocial behaviors dissolve a previously positive relationship and encompass both revenge and avoidance behaviors.  In contrast, prosocial responses such as forgiveness or reconciliation focus on repairing the relationship with the offender.

Several studies perceive organizational justice or injustice as a universal construct regarding its effects in organizations. A few studies examine organizational justice within a cross-cultural context. Recognizing the increase of multicultural collaboration, the importance of a deeper understanding of how individuals from different cultures cope with perceived injustice becomes apparent.

The B.Sc. thesis should critically review the literature on behavioral responses to organizational injustice and analyze how cultural differences can influence responses to injustice in crosscultural contexts.

Colquitt, J. A., Conlon, D. E., Wesson, M. J., Porter, C. O. L. H., & Ng, K. Y. (2001). Justice at the millennium: A meta-analytic review of 25 years of organizational justice research. Journal of Applied Psychology, 86(3), 425–445.

Kim, T.-Y., Shapiro, D. L., Aquino, K., Lim, V. K. G., & Bennett, R. J. (2008). Workplace offense and victims’ reactions: the effects of victim-offender (dis)similarity, offense-type, and cultural differences. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 29(3), 415–433.

Shao, R., Rupp, D. E., Skarlicki, D. P., & Jones, K. S. (2011). Employee Justice Across Cultures. Journal of Management, 39(1), 263–301.

15. Psychological Capital and Expatriate Adjustment

Supervisor: Canan Liedtke

Psychological capital describes the positive psychological state of an individual, which features the resources of hope, effectiveness, resilience and optimism. Resources in this context refer to the persistence in achieving goals and finding alternative solutions, the expectation of a positive future, the ability to recover from drawbacks as well as the mobilization of motivation and cognitive resources. Further, insights indicate that psychological capital can be enhanced through various interventions.

Studies have investigated the relation between psychological capital and employee attitude, specifically also of expatriates. Expatriates face particular challenges during their foreign assignments, which require an adjustment of attitudes according to the cultural environment. Possessing psychological capital can facilitate this process.

The B.Sc. thesis should critically review the literature on psychological capital and explore the impact on employee attitudes, specifically in relation to expatriate adjustment. Furthermore, the thesis should discuss opportunities and challenges of interventions to foster psychological capital for expatriates. 

Avey, J. B., Reichard, R. J., Luthans, F., & Mhatre, K. H. 2011. Meta-analysis of the impact of positive psychological capital on employee attitudes, behaviors, and performance. Human Resource Development Quarterly, 22(2), pp.127–152.

Firth, B. M., Chen, G., Kirkman, B. L., & Kim, K. 2014. Newcomers Abroad: Expatriate Adaptation during Early Phases of International Assignments. Academy of Management Journal, 57(1), 280–300.

Luthans, F., & Youssef-Morgan, C. M. 2017. Psychological Capital: An Evidence-Based Positive Approach. Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior, 4(1), 339–366.

Parts

Mandatory:

Kick off & Methodology seminar
2-days Seminar
Topic allocation at the 2. day

Submission
10 weeks after the Kick off & Methodology seminar
as print and pdf document

Presentations
2-days seminar
round about 2 weeks after submission

Optional components:
individual consultation with your supervisor - more information during the Kick off & Methodology seminar

Time schedule and process

Topic/part Winter term Summer term
Application period August February
Confirmation 15.09. 15.03.
Withdrawal possible 30.09. 31.03.
Kick off & Methodology seminar 2-day seminar - around 01.11. 2-day seminar - around 01.05.
Submission 10 weeks after the Kick off & methodology seminar - current dates here
Presentations 2 weeks after the submission - current dates here

 

Application

Necessary!
If you have been centrally allocated, you are guaranteed a seminar place. However, you still have to register separately.

Type of registration: Online form

(Here available during the registration period. Please note: Confirmation e-mails are not sent during the application period!)

Marking

ECTS-Credits: 12