Geomikrobiologie

Dr. Muammar Mansor

Junior Group Leader

 

Universität Tübingen
Angewandte Geowissenschaften
Schnarrenbergstrasse 94-96
72076 Tübingen

Email: muammar.muammar-bin-mansor@uni-tuebingen.de


Research

As a nano-bio-geochemist, my main interest is in the area of microbial reactions that mediate important environmental processes on both the modern and ancient Earth, and even on other habitable worlds. I am particularly fascinated with the biogeochemistry of metals (e.g., Fe, Cu, Co, Ni) and sulfur, given these elements’ dual importance as bio-essential elements and being toxic at high concentrations. I use an interdisciplinary combination of molecular, geochemical, and modeling tools in order to elucidate the biogeochemical cycling of the elements from the nano- to the global-scale.


Current research interests include:

> Biogeochemistry of trace metals (e.g., Cu, Co, Ni, As) in the environment, and the impacts of Fe in affecting their distributions
> Nano-scale insights into microbial-mineral interactions
> Characterization of metal-bearing nanoparticles and their aggregates through electron microscopy
> Sulfide-based methods for remediation and recovery of heavy metals
> Single-particle or single-cell analysis of metal/mineral contents
> Stable isotope analysis (δ34S, non-traditional metal isotopes) as source and reaction tracers

 

Academic History

2020-present
Junior Group Leader in Geomicrobiology

2017-2019
Postdoctoral fellow in Nanogeomicrobiology

Group of Prof. Jie Xu, University of Texas at El Paso, Texas (USA)

2016-2017
Research Assistant

Laboratory for Isotopes and Metals in the Environment (LIME), Penn State University, Pennsylvania (USA)

2013-2017
Ph.D student in Geosciences & Astrobiology

Co-advised by Prof. Matt Fantle & Prof. Macalady, Penn State University, Pennsylvania (USA)

2012-2013
Master's in Science

M.S. Biotechnology, Penn State University, Pennsylvania (USA)

2009-2012
Bachelor of Science

BSc. Biotechnology, Penn State University, Pennsylvania (USA)


submitted

2020

Mansor, M. & Xu, J. (2020) “Benefits at the nanoscale: a review of nanoparticle‐enabled processes favouring microbial growth and functionality.” Environmental Microbiology. https://doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.15174

Mansor, M., Cantando, E., Wang, Y., Hernandez-Viezcas, J., Gardea-Torresdey, J., Hochella Jr., M.F. & Xu, J. (2020) “Insights into the biogeochemical cycling of cobalt: Precipitation and transformation of cobalt sulfide nanoparticles under low-temperature aqueous conditions.” Environmental Science & Technology, 54(9), 5598-5607. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.0c01363

2019

Mansor, M., Winkler, C., Hochella Jr., M.F. & Xu, J. (2019). “Nanoparticulate nickel-hosting phases in sulfidic environments: Effects of ferrous iron and bacterial presence on mineral formation mechanism and solid-phase nickel distribution.” Frontiers in Earth Science – Earth and Planetary Materials, 7, 151.

Mansor, M. & Fantle, M.S. (2019) “A novel framework for interpreting the pyrite-based Fe isotope records of the past.” Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 253, 39-62.

Mansor, M., Berti, D., Hochella, M., Murayama, M. & Xu, J. (2019) “Phase, morphology, elemental composition and formation mechanisms of biogenic and abiogenic Fe-Cu-sulfide nanoparticles: A comparative study on their occurrences under anoxic conditions.” American Mineralogist, 104(5), 703-717.

2018

Mansor, M., Harouaka, K., Gonzales, M.S., Macalady, J.L. & Fantle, M.S. (2018). “Transport-induced spatial patterns of sulfur isotopes (δ34S) as biosignatures.” Astrobiology, 18(1), 59-72.

2016

Mansor, M. & Macalady, J.L. (2016). “Draft genome sequence of lampenflora Chlorobium limicola strain Frasassi in a sulfidic cave system.” Genome Announcements, 4(3), e00357-16.

Harouaka, K., Mansor, M., Macalady, J.L. & Fantle, M.S. (2016). “Calcium isotopic fractionation in microbially mediated gypsum precipitates.” Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 184, 114-131.

2015

Mansor, M., Hamilton, T.L., Fantle, M.S. & Macalady, J.L. (2015). “Metabolic diversity and ecological niches of Achromatium populations revealed with single-cell genomic sequencing.” Frontiers in Microbiology, 6.