Research Area A: Bacterial Molecules and Cells

Central question:

Which bacterial molecules govern the specific interactions of bacterial cells with other microorganisms and host cells?

Aim

Bacterial fitness and microbial interactions are shaped by multiple factors, including the ability to secrete antimicrobial compounds and to colonize specific niches. Scientists in Research Area A will join forces to identify and isolate from the human microbiome new bacterial strains that produce antimicrobials. The mode of action of these molecules will then be dissected and their ecological role clarified.

In parallel, using a combination of computational, genetic, cellular and biochemical approaches, gene clusters potentially involved in glycopolymer biosynthesis will be identified and their involvement in bacterial adhesion in cooperation with adhesins further characterized in culture systems as well as animal models. The long term goal of Research Area A is to identify microbial effectors that can be targeted or exploited for therapeutic interventions.


Principal Investigators
Prof. Dr. Heike Brötz-Oesterhelt

University of Tübingen
Interfaculty Institute of Microbiology and Infection Medicine
Microbial Bioactive Compounds
Website

Prof. Dr. Samuel Wagner

University of Tübingen
Interfaculty Institute of Microbiology and Infection Medicine
Cellular and Molecular Microbiology
Website

Prof. Dr. Stephanie Grond

University of Tübingen
Institute of Organic Chemistry
Website

 

 

Prof. Dr. em. Wolfgang Wohlleben

University of Tübingen
Interfaculty Institute of Microbiology and Infection Medicine
Microbiology/Biotechnology
Website

Prof. Dr. Andrei Lupas

Max-Planck-Institute for Developmental Biology
Proteinevolution
Website

 

 

Prof. Dr. Nadine Ziemert

University of Tübingen
Interfaculty Institute of Microbiology and Infection Medicine
Applied Natural Products Genome Mining
Website