Uni-Tübingen

Markus Hasl

Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter (Doktorand)

Teilprojekt F07: Die Bedrohung lokaler Ordnungen durch "Land Grabbing": Globale Zivilgesellschaft und völkerrechtlicher Kontext als Fluch oder Segen?

 

   
Dienstadresse: Keplerstraße 2
72074 Tübingen
Raum: 086
Telefon: 07071 29 77545
E-Mail: markus.haslspam prevention@uni-tuebingen.de

Beruflicher Werdegang

  • 2009-2015: Studium der Rechtswissenschaften an der Eberhard-Karls Universität Tübingen
  • 2011-2012: Teilnahme am Philipp C. Jessup Moot Court of International Law für die Universität Tübingen
  • 2012-2013: Studentische Hilfskraft am Lehrstuhl für Völkerrecht, Europarecht, Öffentliches Recht und Staatsphilosophie von Prof. Dr. Oliver Diggelmann, Institut für Völkerrecht und ausländisches Verfassungsrecht der Universität Zürich
  • 2013: Projektbezogenes Stipendium der Reinhold-und-Maria-Teufel-Stiftung für das Engagement im Rahmen des Philipp C. Jessup Moot Court of International Law
  • 2015: Erste Juristische Prüfung - Schwerpunktstudium im Recht der internationalen Beziehungen (Völkerrecht, Europarecht, Internationales Privatrecht und Rechtsvergleichung: Internationales öffentliches Recht)
  • seit 2015: Promotion bei Prof. Dr. Jochen von Bernstorff, LL.M., Lehrstuhl für Öffentliches Recht: Staatsrecht, Völkerrecht, Verfassungslehre und Menschenrechte, Juristische Fakultät der Universität Tübingen
  • seit 2015: Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter am Lehrstuhl für Öffentliches Recht: Staatsrecht, Völkerrecht, Verfassungslehre und Menschenrechte, Prof. Dr. Jochen von Bernstorff, LL.M und Betreuer der Philipp C. Jessup Moot Court Teams 2015-2017 der Universität Tübingen
  • seit 2015: Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter am SFB 923 „Bedrohte Ordnungen“

Forschungsschwerpunkte / wissenschaftliche Interessensgebiete

  • Internationale Institutionen, insbesondere das UN-System
  • Partizipation und Repräsentation der Zivilgesellschaft im Völkerrecht
  • Allgemeines Völkerrecht, Menschenrechte und Nachhaltige Entwicklung

 

Forschungsprojekt im Rahmen des SFB 923

Thema: Participation of affected persons‘ organisations in international law and its institutions

Abstract:

In this research project I examine the recent trend in international law and its institutions to open up for the participation of affected persons‘ organisations. The dissertation studies where this form of civil society participation can be observed, how it is managed and what this actually means for the international legal order.
Although the international legal order is mostly comprised of sovereign states and intergovernmental organisations such as the United Nations, civil society has had access to intergovernmental decision-making for several decades. As expressed most prominently in Article 71 of the United Nations Charter, so called non-governmental organisations (NGOs) – like Greenpeace or Amnesty International – may be consulted in public decision-making processes as they are believed to advocate for public interest issues like the protection of human rights or the environment. The dominance of this ‘public interest paradigm’, however, is increasingly being challenged by the ‘affectedness paradigm’: More and more institutional set-ups have been connecting civil society participation to a status of being ‘affected’ ever since the mid-1990s. This trend includes, for example, the participation of indigenous people’s organizations, disabled persons’ organizations, child-led organizations and associations of people living with HIV/ AIDS in the relevant decision-making bodies of the United Nations system. Most strikingly, small-scale food producers and peasants enjoy a privileged participatory status in the Committee on World Food Security since they are considered to be the most affected by hunger and malnutrition.
However, legal scholars have largely overlooked this shift from public-interest to affectedness. To address this research gap, the dissertation will provide a comparative analysis of the varied fields, institutions and ways in which the ‘affectedness paradigm’ can be identified. The empirical findings will then feed into a typology of affected persons’ participation which, in turn, will provide scholarship and practice with an up-to-date and more precise picture of civil society participation in international law and its institutions.

Publikationen

  • Shifting the Paradigm: A Typology of Affected Populations’ Participation in International Institutions, in: Third World Thematics: A TWQ Journal (in Vorbereitung)

Vorträge

  •  Civil Society participation in international law through the perspective of self-representation. Internationale Tagung „Empowering the Most Affected: A New Paradigm in Global Governance and International Law?“, Universität Tübingen, 18.11.2017.

Tagungen, Workshops, Konferenzen

  • 42nd Meeting, Programme Coordinating Board. Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), Genf, 26.-28.06.2018
  • 3rd Session, United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA 3). United Nations Environment Programme, Nairobi, 27.11.-6.12.2017
  • Internationale Tagung „Empowering the Most Affected: A New Paradigm in Global Governance and International Law?“, Universität Tübingen, 17.-18.11.2017
  • Expert Seminar “The Right to Land and other Natural Resources”, organized by the Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights, the Government of Switzerland, the Permanent Mission of Bolivia to the UN in Geneva, and the Friedrich Ebert Stiftung, Palais des Nations, Genf, 17 November 2016
  • Training on the Rights of Peasants. Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights, Genf, November 2016
  • 43rd Session, Committee on World Food Security. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Rom, 17.-21.10.2016
  • Workshop "Social Movements" (mit Hank Johnston, San Diego State University), SFB 923, 2.6.2016
  • Workshop “Protest over Investment Projects in Land and Natural Resources”, Workshop-Reihe des Arbeitskreises “Natur-Ressourcen-Konflikte” der Arbeitsgemeinschaft Friedens- und Konfliktforschung (AFK), Universität Tübingen, 27-28.11.2015

Lehrveranstaltungen

  • 2015-2017: Philipp C. Jessup International Law Moot Court, Betreuung der Tübinger Teams
  • Sommersemester 2017: Fallbesprechung im Völkerrecht
  • Sommersemester 2016: Probeklausur im Schwerpunktbereich 4a: Internationales Öffentliches Recht