Uni-Tübingen

A 03

Stones from the South. Resource Complexes in Southeastern Iran in the Context of Regional and Interregional Networks

Academic discipline

Near Eastern Archaeology,

Cultural Anthropology

Projektleitung

Pfälzner, Peter, Prof. Dr.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen

Institut für die Kulturen des Alten Orients (IANES)

Schloss Hohentübingen

Burgsteige 11

72070 Tübingen

Telephone: +49 7071 29 78530

Email: peter.pfaelzner@uni-tuebingen.de 

 

Klocke-Daffa, Sabine, PD Dr.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen

Asien-Orient-Institut, Abteilung für Ethnologie

Burgsteige 11

72070 Tübingen

Telephone: +49 7071 29 78539

Email: sabine.klocke-daffaspam prevention@ethno.uni-tuebingen.de

PhD candidates
and Postdocs

Frauen, Wulf, Dr.

SFB 1070 RessourcenKulturen

Gartenstr. 29

Room 315

72074 Tübingen

Email: wulf-marten.frauenspam prevention@uni-tuebingen.de

 

Karami, Mohammad, Dr. des.

SFB 1070 RessourcenKulturen

Room 315

Gartenstr. 29

72074 Tübingen

Email: mohammad.karamispam prevention@uni-tuebingen.de

This project deals with the question, which ResourceComplexes may emerge in a landscape defined by mostly constant natural conditions and a largely unchanged potential of natural resources but changing external conditions. What kinds of networks, made of people, materials, objects and knowledge were and are still needed for their activation and maintenance. A specific explanatory model is used as a common basis for the investigation and reconstruction of resources central to the region at distinct periods. It assumes a ResourceComplex of agriculture, crafts and trade which only becomes usable and is set in value by its integration into specifically constructed networks of relationships. Amongst others the components of these networks include producers, traders, settlements, soil, technological knowledge and objects. Such ResourceAssemblages combined from ResourceComplexes and networks serve as framing structures in the field of tension of infrastructure, value system, politics, religion etc. On one hand the ResourceComplexes supported by networks in the region are dependent on natural conditions, on the other in each different period they are subject to specific culturally and socially influenced dynamics. This in turn shapes the respective regional and interregional systems of exchange.

After having examined the archaeological base data of the hitherto almost unexplored region of southern Kerman during the first phase of funding, the archaeological part of the project will continue its work by studying the Bronze Age networks in more detail with new fieldwork. Additionally the networks of older and younger periods will serve as comparisons. Part of this will be the study of the relationship between deposits of raw-materials, settlements, routes – especially those leading towards the Persian Gulf – the dependence of settlements on natural conditions and its resulting economic potential, the hierarchies of settlements and the socio-economic relations between specific areas, such as mountain ranges, valleys and plains. The provenance of objects made from chlorite and diorite/gabbro will be determined by scientific analyses in order to reconstruct the ancient networks of exchange.

In a complementary way cultural anthropology will study the contemporary networks in the region. This will include specifically the settlements within the archaeologically studied sub-regions together with other locational factors, the cultural significance of regional and interregional exchange relations, the current use of mineral resources (chromite, and gemstones), as well as intangible resources, such as technological knowledge, social capital and the analyses of (social, economic and political) connections between geographically different sub-regions.

The Way of the Stones – Green Garnet from Iran

A film by PD Dr. Sabine Klocke-Daffa

Since millennia precious stones from Iran were traded. They are a symbol for wealth and are said to enhance luck and health. In mountainous southern Iran green garnet is supplementing the economic basis for the local pastoralists. The stones are traded from the highlands to the country’s bazars and then are distributed world-wide.

 To see the film, please click here

Date Palms in Iran

A film with Dr. Wulf Frauen

Date palms were grown for more than 4000 years in Jiroft in southern Iran. Up to the present day these trees are used for a multitude of products: mats and baskets made from the leaves, fences and huts using the trunks, inflorescences used as brooms, and, not least, fruits for consumption. The cultivation of date palms is a notable trait of continuity within the ever-changing cultures of southern Iran.

To see the film, please click here