Uni-Tübingen

C 02

C 02

Resources and their (Re-) Construction in Literature during the 4th Century BC. The Past as Resource Knowledge

 

Academic discipline

Classical Philology/Greek Studies

Classical History

Project management

Männlein-Robert, Irmgard, Prof. Dr.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen

Philologisches Seminar

Wilhelmstraße 36

72074 Tübingen

Telephone: +49 7071 29 72367 (Secr.)

E-mail: irmgard.maennlein-robertspam prevention@uni-tuebingen.de

 

Stanzel, Karl-Heinz, Prof. Dr.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen

Philologisches Seminar

Wilhelmstraße 36

72074 Tübingen

Telephone: +49 7071 29 76743

E-mail: karl-heinz.stanzelspam prevention@uni-tuebingen.de

 

Meier, Mischa, Prof. Dr.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen

Seminar für Alte Geschichte

Wilhelmstraße 36

72074 Tübingen

Telephone: +49 7071 29 78520

E-mail: mischa.meierspam prevention@uni-tuebingen.de

 

PhD candidates

and Postdocs

Mozdzen, Nadja, M.A.

SFB 1070 RessourcenKulturen

Gartenstr. 29

Room 311

72074 Tübingen

Telephone: +49 7071 29 73589

E-mail: nadja.mozdzenspam prevention@uni-tuebingen.de

 

Lo Casto, Claudia, Dr.

SFB 1070 RessourcenKulturen

Gartenstr. 29

72074 Tübingen

E-mail: claudia.lo-castospam prevention@uni-tuebingen.de

During the first phase of the project Greek poetic texts– especially from Hesiod and Arat – were reviewed from different perspectives. Subject were on the one hand their metapoetic reflexion of agrarian and cultural resources, on the other the recent evaluation of these discourses. Besides agriculture, astronomy and seafaring the mythical narrative tradition and the mythical presentation of resources as well as the representation of mobility and migration were in the focus of the study.

During the second phase the project is analysing the literary and rhetorical (re-) construction of resource knowledge about the past, or the past as a resource. In practice the role of real, reconstructed or constructed (fictional) historical knowledge in philosophic and political discourses about (social) orders is studied as well as how it was created. 4th cent. BC Athens is especially suited for this research, because an intensive discussion of different orders and the own (imaginary) past took place during this time and the related discourses are well documented in writing. As a consequence of the Peloponnesian War a political, military and economic restructuring took place in the Greek world during the beginning of the 4th cent. BC. Athens lost influence and went through an external and internal re-orientation, but still remained a central political and cultural actor. The philosophic-theoretical literature, as well as numerous political and juridical speeches relate – implicitly or explicitly, in a positive or negative sense – to these socio-cultural dynamics. The knowledge comprehended in these texts can be considered as a resource as defined by SFB 1070. Project C02 analyses mainly Plato’s ‘Republic’ and ‘Laws’, as well as about one hundred Athenian political and juridical speeches (for example of Andokides, Lysias, Isokrates, Isaios, Demosthenes, Aischines and Hypereides) in order to understand how this assumed knowledge about Athenian history was turned into a – manipulable – resource. The project consists of two case studies: one based on Classical Philology (The Ideal State: Knowledge as a Resource – Knowledge about Resources in Plato’s ‘Republic’ and ‘Laws’), the other (Ancient Athens and Democracy: An Imagined Order? Resource Knowledge in Political Discourses of the 4th cent. BC) on Classical History.

Ancient Knowledge - Texts as a Resource

A film with Xenja Herren

Historical knowledge may be used as an important resource for a society. Texts of the Greek authors Plato, Demosthenes and Lycurgus are analysed under this aspect. They offer insights into the use of knowledge about the past in order to develop new concepts of state and democracy.

To see the film, please click here.