Fachbereich Mathematik

Vergangene Semester

Sommersemester 2021

Prof. Dr. Carla Cederbaum

Beweise der Isoperimetrischen Ungleichung
Seminar
Date: Wednesday 
Time: 11:15 - 12:00 
Place: online via Zoom

Eine Vorbesprechung findet am Donnerstag, den 11. Februar 2021, um 13:30 Uhr per Zoom statt.

Prof. Dr. Carla Cederbaum

Mathematical Relativity
Lecture
Start: Monday, 19 April
Time: Wednesdays, 8:30 - 10:00 

Prof. Dr. Carla Cederbaum

Mathematical Physics Colloquium
Seminar
Start: Wednesday, 21 April
Time: Wednesdays, 12:15 - 13:45 

For more information

Prof. Dr. Gerhard Huisken

Geometrische Evolutionsgleichungen
Seminar
Date:  Wednesdays
Time: 10:15-11:45
Place: Online
Start: 28th April 2021

If there is interest please send an email to <gerhard.huiskenspam prevention@uni-tuebingen.de>

Wintersemester 2020/21

Prof. Dr. Carla Cederbaum

Beweise der Isoperimetrischen Ungleichung
Seminar
Date: Dienstags
Time: 14:15 to 16:00 
Place: online

Vorbesprechung: Donnerstag, den 02. Juli 2020, um 14:15 Uhr per Zoom

Prof. Dr. Gerhard Huisken

Ausgewählte Themen zu geometrischen Evolutionsgleichungen (mit Übungen)/ Special topics in evolution equations (with tutorials) Vorlesung (2+2SWS)
Time/ Place : online (asynchron)


Exercise sessions:
Stephen Lynch

Begin: Wednesday, 4th November 2020
Time: Wednesdays from 9.30 to 10.30
Place: N16

Sommersemester 2020

Zielgruppe:

Bachelor- und Lehramtsstudenten

 

Prof. Dr. Gerhard Huisken

Kurven und Flächen Proseminar (2 SWS)

Begin: Thursday, 14. April 2020
Time: Thursdays from 10:15 to 12:00
Place: N 15
Vorbesprechung: Freitag, 07.02., 14 Uhr s.t., S9

Fällt aus / Cancelled

Prof. Dr. Carla Cederbaum

Fixpunktsätze
Proseminar
Date: Monday, 23 March 2020 to Friday, 27 March 2020
Time: est. 9:00 to 16:00 
Place: est. N14

Vorbesprechung: Dienstag, 28.01.2020, 13 Uhr s.t., S9

Zielgruppe:

Master in Mathematik und Mathematical Physics

Oberseminar

Time: Thursdays from 14:15 to 16:00
Place: C9A03
Einladende: Carla Cederbaum / Gerhard Huisken

Zu den Vorträgen

 

 

Prof. Dr. Carla Cederbaum

Mathematical Relativity

Time: Tuesday and Friday, 2.15 pm to 4 pm

Begin: Tuesday, April 14th 2020

Place: N16

Attention: Friday, 15th May in N15

Prof. Dr. Gerhard Huisken

Ricci-Fluß
Vorlesung (2 SWS)

Begin: Friday, 17. April 2020
Time: Fridays from 10:15 to 12:00
Place: N 14

Dr. Armando Cabrera Pacheco

Riemannian Geometry

Begin: Tuesday, 14th April 2020
Time: 10 c.t. to 12:00
Place: Room 4H33

Dr. Edward Bryden

Introduction to Special Relativity

Begin: Wednesday, 15th April 2020
Time: 10 c.t. to 12:00
Place: C4H33

Wintersemester 2019/20

Prof. Dr. Gerhard Huisken

Nichtlineare elliptische und parabolische partielle Differentialgleichungen
Vorlesung (2+2SWS)

Begin: Friday, 18. October 2019
Time: Fridays from 10:15 to 12:00
Place: N16
Exercise sessions:
Stephen Lynch

Begin: Thursday, October 24th 2019
Time: Thursdays from 10 to 12 
Place: S9

­

Dr. Armando Cabrera Pacheco

Selected topics in mathematical relativity and geometric analysis
Seminar

Begin: Wednesday, October 16th 2019
Time: Wednesday from 10.15 to 12:00
Place: C5H10 (Seminar Room 7)

­

Dr. Edward Bryden

Advanced methods in general relativity

Vorlesung

Begin: Wednesday, October 16th 2019

Time: Wednesday from 16 c.t. to 18:00

Place: C-N16 / M3

 

Sommersemester 2019

Space-Like Hypersurfaces in Lorentzian Manifolds

Dozent: Prof. Dr. Gerhard Huisken
Beginn: Freitag, 26. April 2019
Zeit: Freitag, 10 Uhr c.t. bis 12 Uhr, N14

Zielgruppe: Master in Mathematik und Mathematical Physics
Prüfungsgebiet: Reine Mathematik

Beschreibung / Description

The course describes analytical and geometric aspects of space-like slices in Lorentzian manifolds in
the context of models in General Relativity. Particular topics to be discussed are “maximal surfaces”,
“constant mean curvature surfaces”, “(3+1)-formulation of the Einstein equations in a given slicing”,
“existence and uniqueness results for space-like slices”.

Die Vorlesung behandelt analytische und geometrische Eigenschaften raumartiger Hyperflächen in Lo-
retzschen Mannigfaltigkeiten, jeweils im Zusammenhang mit physikalischen Motivationen durch Model-
le der Algemeinen Relativitätstheorie. Spezifische Themen sind “Maximalflächen”, “Flächen konstanter
mittlerer Krümmung”, “(3+1)-Formulierung der Einstein-Gleichungen in geeigneten Blätterungen der
Raum-Zeit”, “Existenz und Eindeutigkeit bestimmter Hyperflächen”.

Voraussetzungen / Prerequisites

One course in differential geometry and one course in partial differential equations
Je eine Vorlesung über Partielle Differentialgleichungen und Differentialgeometrie

Literatur

Hawking–Ellis, The Large-Scale-Structure of Space-Time, Cambridge Univ. Press.
O’Neill, Semi-Riemannian Geometry, Academic Press
Gilbarg–Trudinger, Elliptic PDEs of Second Order, Springer Grundlehren
Wald, General Relativity, The University of Chicago Press

Prüfung

Written or oral exam depending on course size

Je nach Größe der Veranstaltung gibt es eine Klausur oder mündliche Prüfung.

Übungsgruppe

Stephen Lynch
Einzeltermin: Dienstag, den 30. April 2019, 10-12 Uhr, S 8
Mittwochs, 10-12 Uhr, S 11; Beginn: 08. Mai 2019

­

Mathematical Relativity

Lecturer: Dr. Melanie Graf
Time: Tuesday and Thursday, 4.15pm to 6pm, starting April 16th 2019
Place: N17
Teaching assistant: Sophia Jahns, [cryptmail:pdlowr-mdkqvCpdwk1xql0wxhelqjhq1gh|H0Pdlo vhqghq]

Description

After a short introduction to Special Relativity and its underlying Minkowskian geometry, we will study
general Lorentzian manifolds and the Einstein equations of General Relativity.

One part of the lecture course will focus on static solutions of the Einstein equation, describing space-
times that are in a state of equilibrium. These solutions are geometrically rather simple and therefore
suitable for a first approach to geometric, analytic, and physical questions about spacetimes and iso-
lated systems. In particular, we will prove the Bunting–Masood-ul-Alaam static black hole uniqueness theorem.

In the second part, we will investigate causality, cosmological models, and the Big Bang, specifically
the Penrose–Hawking singularity theorems.

Requirements

Geometry in Physics or Differential Geometry or Mathematische Physik: Klassische Mechanik
Useful, but not required: Linear PDEs

Literature

R. M. Wald, General Relativity, The University of Chicago Press (1984).
H. Fischer und H. Kaul, Mathematik fur Physiker, Band 3, Springer Spektrum, 3. Auflage (2013)
B. O’Neill, Semi-Riemannian Geometry With Applications to Relativity, Academic Press, Math. 103
S. W. Hawking und G. F. R. Ellis, The large scale structure of space-time, Cambridge Monographs
on Mathematical Physics (1973).

Exam

To be admitted to the exam, you will need to get 50% of all points on the exercise sheets (including the
project theses, see below). Depending on the number of participants, the exam will be written or oral

Project theses

In the week of June 24 to 28, the participants will be asked to write little project theses about classicals
result in GR instead of solving exercises. The project theses will count like two exercise sheets.

Exercise classes

Time and place to be determined in the first lecture.

­

Limits of Spaces

Lecturer: PD Dr. Martin Kell
Time: Mondays and Wednesdays, 10:15pm to 12pm, starting April 15th 2019
Place: S09

Description

In this course basic concepts of metric geometry like geodesics, doubling property of measures and Hausdorff measures are introduced and their properties are investigated. Furthermore, generalized curvature conditions in the sense of Alexandrov and Busemann are studied and the convergence concepts of Gromov-Hausdorff and the ultra convergence are presented and a proof of Gromov's Precompactness Theorem and other stability theorems will be developed.

Requirements

Analysis I+II and some measure theory.

Literature

Jeff Cheeger, David Ebin: Comparison Theorems in Riemannian Geometry, AMS 1975.
Dimitri Burago, Yuri Burago, Sergei Ivano: A Course in Metric Geometry, AMS 2001.
Mikhail Gromov: Metric Structures for Riemannian and Non-Riemannian Spaces, Springer 2007.

 

Wintersemester 2018/19

Vortragsreihe - Singularities of geometric flows

Dozent: Prof. Dr. Simon Brendle

Donnerstag, den 13. Dezember 2018 14 Uhr c.t.-16 Uhr 7 E 02 (Hörsaalzentrum)    
Donnerstag, den 20. Dezember 2018 14 Uhr c.t.-16 Uhr 7 E 02 (Hörsaalzentrum)    
Donnerstag, den 10. Januar 2010 14 Uhr c.t.-16 Uhr 7 E 02 (Hörsaalzentrum)    

 

Beschreibung / Description

I will discuss the formation of singularities under the mean curvature and Ricci flow. We know from work Perelman that singularities are often modeled on ancient solutions. These are solutions that have a backhistory going back infinitely far in time; as such, they are analogous to entire solutions of elliptic PDEs. It is a central problem to classify these ancient solutions. I will discuss recent uniqueness theorems for ancient solutions.

­

Geometrische Evolutionsgleichungen / Geometric Evolution Equations

Dozent: Prof. Dr. Gerhard Huisken
Beginn: Freitag, den 26. Oktober 2018
Ort: Hörsaal N15 / M2
Zeit: Freitags, 10 Uhr c.t. bis 12 Uhr

Beschreibung / Description

The course describes central techniques for the analysis of solutions to geometric evolution equations such as mean curvature flow and Gauss curvature flow of hyper surfaces or Ricci flow of Riemannian metrics. Topics covered include the maximum principle for tensorial parabolic equations, smoothing properties, estimates based on monotonicity formulae and rescaling techniques leading to pseudo-locality results and the classification of singularities. The course will touch on recent developments in the field that are suitable for projects of a master thesis.

Die Vorlesung behandelt zentrale Techniken für die Untersuchung von Lösungen geometrischer Evolutionsgleichungen wie den Fluss von Hyperflächen entlang der mittleren Krümmung und entlang der Gauss-Krümmung oder des Ricci-Flusses von Riemannschen Metriken. Zu den behandelten Themen gehören Maximum-Prinzipien für tensorielle Systeme parabolischer Gleichungen, Glättungseigenschaften der Flüsse, Monotonieformeln und Reskalierungstechniken, mit denen Pseudo-Lokalitätseigenschaften und Klassifizierung von Singularitäten bewiesen werden können. Die Vorlesung führt zu einigen neueren Ergebnissen des Forschungsgebiet und eignet sich als Grundlage für eine Masterarbeit.

Voraussetzungen / Prerequisites

One course in differential geometry and one course in partial differential equations

Je eine Vorlesung über Partielle Differentialgleichungen und Differentialgeometrie

Literatur

  • Klaus EckerRegularity theory of mean curvature flows, Birkhäuser Verlag Basel, 2004.
  • Simon BrendleRicci Flow and the Sphere Theorem (Graduate Studies in Mathematics), American Mathematical Society, 2010.
  • Leon Simon, Theorems on the Regularity and Singularity of Minimal Surfaces and Harmonic Maps (S.~115--150) in Lecture Notes on Geometric Variational Problems, S.~Nishikawa and R.~Schoen, Springer Tokyo (1996)

Modulhandbuch

Prüfungsgebiet: Reine Mathematik

Studien- und Prüfungsleistungen / Type of exam

Written or oral exam depending on course size.

Je nach Größe der Veranstaltung gibt es eine Klausur oder mündliche Prüfung.

­

Harmonische Abbildungen / Harmonic Maps

Dozent: Prof. Dr. Gerhard Huisken
Beginn:
Donnerstag, den 18. Oktober 2018
Ort: Seminarraum S10
Zeit: Donnerstag, 10 Uhr c.t. bis 12 Uhr

Beschreibung / Description

The seminar will explore the basic theory of harmonic mappings between Riemannian manifolds. Topics start with the Dirichlet energy of a mapping between Riemannian manifolds and the corresponding Euler-Lagrange equation and then lead to the regularity properties of solutions to this system of partial differential equations. Further topics are weak solutions, the Heat flow corresponding to harmonic maps and applications of harmonic maps in the Description of black holes in General Relativity.

Das Seminar untersucht grundlegende Eigenschaften harmonischer Abbildungen zwischen Riemannschen Mannigfaltigkeiten. Thema betreffen die Dirichlet-Energie von Abbildungen und die zugehörigen Euler-Lagrange Gleichungen sowie die Regularitätstheorie für Lösungen dieses Systems elliptischer Gleichungen. Weitere Themen betreffen den zugehörigen Wärmefluss und schliesslich Anwendungen harmonischer Abbildungen bei der Beschreibung schwarzer Löcher in der allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie.

Voraussetzungen / Prerequisites

One course in differential geometry and one course in partial differential equations

Je eine Vorlesung über Partielle Differentialgleichungen und Differentialgeometrie

Literatur

  • Jürgen Jost, Harmonic Maps between surfaces, Springer
  • Richard Schoen and Shing-Tung YauHarmonic Maps, International Press

Modulhandbuch

Prüfungsgebiet: Reine Mathematik

Studien- und Prüfungsleistungen / Type of exam

Written or oral exam depending on course size, evaluation of seminar presentation.

Je nach Größe der Veranstaltung gibt es eine Klausur oder mündliche Prüfung, Auswertung des Seminarvortrags.

­

Elementare Differentialgeometrie zum Anfassen

Dozentinnen: Prof. Dr. Carla Cederbaum (Tenure Track), Lisa Hilken
Beginn: Montag, 08.10.2018 bzw. Dienstag, 16.10.2018
Ort: 8D09 im Hörsaalzentrum
Zeit: Montag, 08.10.2018 ganztags und jeden zweiten Dienstag, 14 Uhr c. t. bis 16 oder 18 Uhr (abwechselnd)

Beschreibung

Was haben Slalom fahren, Bananen und Seifenblasen mit Mathematik zu tun?

Einiges! Was genau werden wir im Seminar „Elementare Differentialgeometrie zum Anfassen“ herausfinden.Dazu beschäftigen wir uns mit Kurven und Flächen und überlegen uns, was „Krümmung“ eigentlich ist.

Wir werden uns der Thematik auf experimentelle Weise nähern und die zugehörige Mathematik mithilfe unserer Erfahrungen und Beobachtungen entwickeln. Am Ende werden wir mathematisch saubere Definitionenund Sätze hergeleitet haben.

Vorraussetzungen

Lineare Algebra 1+2 und Analysis 1+2

Literatur

  • Abbott, Edwin A., Flatland, Oxford University Press
  • Henderson, David W., Differential Geometry, online
  • do Carmo, Manfredo P.Differentialgeometrie von Kurven und Flächen, Vieweg+Teubner
  • Bär, Christian, Elementare Differentialgeometrie, De Gruyter

Bemerkungen

Das Seminar richtet sich an Lehramtsstudierende.

Tag und Uhrzeit des Seminars können bei Bedarf noch geändert werden.

­

Geometry of Initial Data Sets

Dozent: Dr. Armando Cabrera Pacheco
Beginn: Mittwoch, den 17. Oktober 2018
Zeit und Ort: Mittwochs, 12 Uhr c.t. bis 14 Uhr in C9A03; Montags, 16 Uhr c.t. bis 18 Uhr in Seminarraum S11 (Übung)

Beschreibung / Description

The main goal of this course is to gain a working understanding of some classic and current research topics in mathematical relativity.

We will be mainly interested in studying the geometry of initial data sets for the Einstein Equations, i.e., spacelike slices of spacetimes satisfying certain physical assumptions. Mathematically, they correspond to Riemannian manifolds with geometric constraints.

The course will start with a careful review the geometric constraints to be imposed on an initial data set and the concept of total mass. Then we will study the main ideas behind the proofs of the positive mass theorem and the Riemannian Penrose inequality. After this, some selected topics about graphical initial data sets, quasi-local mass notions, and explicit initial data set construction will be covered.

Voraussetzungen / Prerequisites

Geometry in Physics and Mathematical Relativity or some other course containing some submanifolds theory.

Literature

  • Cabrera Pacheco, A. J., Cederbaum, C., McCormick, S., and Miao, P., Asymptotically flat exten- sions of CMC Bartnik data, Class. Quantum Grav. 34, 2017.
  • Huisken, G. and Ilmanen, T., The inverse mean curvature flow and the Riemannian Penrose inequality, J. Differential Geom. 59, 2001.
  • Lam, M.-K. G., The graphs cases of the Riemannian positive mass and Penrose inequalities in all dimensions, arXiv:1010.4256, 2010.
  • Lee, J. M., Riemannian manifolds: An introduction to curvature, Graduate Texts in Mathematics 176, Springer-Verlag New York, 1997.
  • Mantoulidis, C., and Schoen, R., On the Bartnik mass of outer apparent horizons, Class. Quantum Grav. 20, 2015.
  • Schoen, R., Yau, S.-T., On the proof of the positive mass conjecture in general relativity, Comm. Math. Phys. 65, 1979.

* This is not an extensive list. We will only cover parts of these references and they are not intended to be covered prior to the class.

Studien- und Prüfungsleistungen / Type of exam

Each student will be asked to explain solutions to relevant homework exercises during the exercise sessions (these will be timely assigned). To be admitted to the exam (written or oral depending on the size of the class), you will need to have presented at least three exercises at a satisfactory level.

Sommersemester 2018

Vortragsreihe - Geometric flows and singularity formation

Dozent: Prof. Dr. Simon Brendle

Donnerstag, den 17. Mai 2018 14 Uhr c.t.-16 Uhr N9
Freitag, den 01. Juni 2018 14 Uhr c.t.-16 Uhr N14
Freitag, den 08. Juni 2018 14 Uhr c.t.-16 Uhr N14
Freitag, den 15. Juni 2018 14 Uhr c.t.-16 Uhr N14

Beschreibung

In these lectures, I will discuss the formation of singularities for embedded, mean convex hypersurfaces evolving under mean curvature flow. Among other things, I will discuss the main a-priori estimates, and some recent results on the classification of singularity models. For example, for two-dimensional surfaces in R^3 (or for uniformly two-convex hypersurfaces in higher dimensions), the only possible singularity models are the shrinking spheres, shrinking cylinders, and the rotationally symmetric bowl soliton.

­

Geometrische Ungleichungen

Dozent: Prof. Dr. Gerhard Huisken
Beginn:
Freitag, den 20. April 2018
Ort: Hörsaal N15 / M2
Zeit: Freitags, 10 Uhr c.t. bis 12 Uhr

Beschreibung / Description

The course investigates geometric inequalities that arise from geometric variational problems and are important for the understanding of geometric partial differential equations. Inequalities that will be explored are estimates on the first eigenvalue of the Laplace operator under natural assumptions on the underlying domain, the proof of the fundamental gap conjecture concerning the first two eigenvalues of the Schrödinger operator on a convex domain, and the positivity of mass in General Relativity with its relation to conformal geometry.

Die Vorlesung untersucht geometrische Ungleichungen, die aus geometrischen Variationsproblemen entstehen und bei der Untersuchung von Lösungen geometrischer partieller Differentialgleichungen eine zentrale Rolle spielen. Insbesondere sollen Abschätzungen an den ersten Eigenwert des Laplace Operators bewiesen werden unter verschiedenen Annahmen an das zu Grunde liegende Gebiet, darüber hinaus der Beweis der "fundamental gap conjecture" sowie der Beweis der Positivität der Masse in der Allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie in Zusammenhang mit der konformen Geometrie Riemannscher Mannigfaltigkeiten.

Voraussetzungen / Prerequisites

Knowledge of differential equations and differential geometry comparable to one course each.

Grundlagen in partiellen Differentialgleichungen und Differentialgeometrie im Umfang von je einer Vorlesung.

Literatur

 

  • D. Gilbarg; N.S. TrudingerElliptic Partial Differential Equations of Second Order, Springer-Verlag, 3rd ed 1998.
    L.C. EvansPartial Differential Equations, American Mathematical Society, 1998.
  • K. EckerRegularity theory of mean curvature flows, Birkhäuser Verlag Basel, 2004.
  • S. BrendleRicci Flow and the Sphere Theorem (Graduate Studies in Mathematics), American Mathematical Society, 2010.
  • G. LiebermanSecond order parabolic differential equations, World Scientific, 1996.
    D. Kinderlehrer; G. Stampacchia, An Introduction to Variational Inequalities and Their Applications, SIAM, 2000.
  • R. Schoen; S.-T. Yau, Lectures in Differential Geometry, International Press, 1994.
  • M. Ritore; C. Sinestrari, Mean curvature flow and isoperimetric inequalities, Advanced courses in mathematics CRM Barcelona, Birkhäuser, 2000.
  • L. Simon, Lectures on Geometric Measure Theory, Australian National University, 1993.

 

Modulhandbuch

Modulcode: MAT6016V (Masterstudenten Mathematik and Math. Physics)

Prüfungsgebiet: Reine Mathematik

 

Studien- und Prüfungsleistungen / Type of exam

Written or oral exam depending on course size.

Je nach Größe der Veranstaltung gibt es eine Klausur oder mündliche Prüfung.

­

Mathematical Relativity

Professor: JProf. Dr. Carla Cederbaum
Time and place: Tue and Thu, 4.15 pm to 6 pm, N16; starting Apr 17

Teaching assistant: Sophia Jahns, jahns@math.uni-tuebingen.de

Description

After a short introduction to Special Relativity and its underlying Minkowskian geometry, we will study

general Lorentzian manifolds and the Einstein equations of General Relativity.

 

One part of the lecture course will focus on static solutions of the Einstein equation, describing space-

times that are in a state of equilibrium. These solutions are geometrically rather simple and therefore

suitable for a first approach to geometric, analytic, and physical questions about spacetimes and iso-

lated systems. In particular, we will prove the Bunting–Masood-ul-Alaam static black hole uniqueness

theorem.

In the second part, we will investigate causality, cosmological models, and the Big Bang, specifically

the Penrose–Hawking singularity theorems.

Requirements

Geometry in Physics or Differential Geometry or Mathematische Physik: Klassische Mechanik

Useful, but not required: Linear PDEs

Literature

  • R. M. Wald, General Relativity, The University of Chicago Press (1984)
  • H. Fischer und H. Kaul, Mathematik für Physiker, Band 3, Springer Spektrum, 3. Auflage (2013)
  • B. O’Neill, Semi-Riemannian Geometry With Applications to Relativity, Academic Press, Math. 103
  • S. W. Hawking und G. F. R. Ellis, The large scale structure of space-time, Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics (1973)

Exam

To be admitted to the exam, you will need to get 50% of all points on the exercise sheets (including the project theses, see below). Depending on the number of participants, the exam will be written or oral.

Project theses

In the week of May 14 – 18, the participants will be asked to write little project theses about classicals result in GR instead of solving exercises. The project theses will count like two exercise sheets.

Tutorials

Time and place to be determined in the first lecture.

 

Wintersemester 2017/18

Vortragsreihe - Ricci flow in higher dimensions

Dozent: Prof. Dr. Simon Brendle

Mittwoch, 13.12.2017 16 c.t. - 18 Uhr N9
Freitag, 15.12.2017 15 c.t. - 17 Uhr H2C14
Mittwoch, 10.01.2018 10 c.t. - 12 Uhr H2C14

Beschreibung

Hamilton's Ricci flow is one of the most important geometric evolution equations.
In these lectures, I will focus on the problem of singularity formation in higher dimensions. In particular, I will discuss under what conditions the flow converges to a round metric after rescaling, and under what conditions the flow will form singularities of neck-pinch type. This requires new pinching estimates for the curvature ODE in higher dimensions.

­

Der Minimalflächenoperator

Dozent: Prof. Dr. Gerhard Huisken
Beginn: Freitag, den 20. Oktober 2017
Ort: Hörsaal N08
Zeit: Freitags, 10 Uhr c.t. bis 12 Uhr

Beschreibung

Die Vorlesung untersucht zunächst Randwertprobleme für den Minimalflächenoperator, insbesondere Minimalflächen und Flächen vorgeschriebener mittlerer Krümmung, im Kontext quasilinearer elliptischer partieller Differentialgleichungen. Danach wenden wir diese Techniken an, um zunächst translatierende Lösungen geometrischer Evolutionsgleichungen zu konstruieren. Hiermit können dann schliesslich allgemeine schwache Lösungen des Flusses von Hyperflächen entlang der mittleren und entlang der inversen mittleren Krümmung konstruiert werden.

Voraussetzungen

Grundlagen in partiellen Differentialgleichungen und Differentialgeometrie im Umfang von je einer Vorlesung.

Literatur

  • D. Gilbarg; N.S. Trudinger, Elliptic Partial Differential Equations of Second Order, Springer-Verlag, 3rd ed 1998.
    L.C. Evans, Partial Differential Equations, American Mathematical Society, 1998.
  • K. Ecker, Regularity theory of mean curvature flows, Birkhäuser Verlag Basel, 2004.
  • S. BrendleRicci Flow and the Sphere Theorem (Graduate Studies in Mathematics), American Mathematical Society, 2010.
  • G. Lieberman, Second order parabolic differential equations, World Scientific, 1996.
    D. Kinderlehrer; G. Stampacchia, An Introduction to Variational Inequalities and Their Applications, SIAM, 2000.

Modulhandbuch

Modulcode: MAT - 60 - 15 (Masterstudenten)
Prüfungsgebiet: Reine Mathematik

Studien- und Prüfungsleistungen

Je nach Größe der Veranstaltung gibt es eine Klausur oder mündliche Prüfung.

­

Eindimensionale Variationsrechnung

Dozentinnen: JProf. Dr. Carla Cederbaum, Sophia Jahns
Zeit: 7.-8. Oktober und 21.-22. Oktober 2017, ganztags

Beschreibung


In der eindimensionalen Variationsrechnung werden Ideen aus der Analysis 1 mithilfer von Techniken aus der Analysis 2 sowie der Linearen Algebra auf sogenannte Funktionale übertragen. Funktionale sind (in diesem Seminar) Funktionen von einem reellen Funktionenraum in die reellen Zahlen. Ein wichtiges Beispiel ist das Längenfunktional, das jeder differenzierbaren Kurve (etwa in R^n) oder auf einer Fläche) ihre Länge zuordnet. Hier mann man mithilfe der Variationsrechnung die Frage beantworten, was die kürzeste Verbindung zwischen zwei gegebenen Punkten ist.

Weitere klassische Probleme und Sätze, die wir im Seminar kennenlernen werden, sind:

  • das isoperimetrische Problem, also die Frage danach, wie eine Kurve vorgegebener Länge verlaufen muss, um ein Gebiet mit moeglichst grossem Flächeninhalt einzuschliessen.
  • das Fermatsche Prinzip, das den Weg von Licht in einem Medium beschreibt,
  • die Frage nach der Oberfläche von Rotationsflächen mit minimalen Flächeninhalt
  • sowie weitere geometrische und physikalische Probleme.


Wir werden im Seminar von diesen konkreten Problemstellungen ausgehen und uns die zu ihrer Lösung nötigen Techniken aus der Variationsrechnung und der Funktionalanalysis erarbeiten.

Voraussetzungen

Lineare Algebra 1+2, Analysis 1+2 und Grundlagen der (eindimensionalen) Lebesgue-Integration (aus Analysis 3 oder Stochastik 1, diese Grundlagen der Lebesgue-Integration können aber auch im Vorfeld im Selbststudium erarbeitet werden).

Literatur

  • Buttazo, G.; Giaquinta, M.; und Hildebrandt, S; One-dimensional Variational Problems, Oxford University Press, 1998
  • Weinstock, R.; Calculus of Variations. With applications to physics and engineering, Dover Publications, 1952

­

Elementare Differentialgeometrie zum Anfassen

Dozentinnen: JProf. Dr. Carla Cederbaum, Lisa Hilken
Beginn: Mittwoch, 25. Oktober 2017
Zeit: Mittwochs, 14 Uhr c.t. bis 18 Uhr, 14-täglich

Beschreibung
 

Was haben Slalom fahren, Bananen und Seifenblasen mit Mathematik zu tun?

Einiges! Was genau werden wir im Seminar „Elementare Differentialgeometrie zum Anfassen“ herausfinden.Dazu beschäftigen wir uns mit Kurven und Flächen und überlegen uns, was „Krümmung“ eigentlich ist.

Wir werden uns der Thematik auf experimentelle Weise nähern und die zugehörige Mathematik mithilfe unserer Erfahrungen und Beobachtungen entwickeln. Am Ende werden wir mathematisch saubere Definitionenund Sätze hergeleitet haben.

Vorraussetzungen

Lineare Algebra 1+2 und Analysis 1+2

Literatur

  • Abbott, Edwin A., Flatland, Oxford University Press
  • Henderson, David W., Differential Geometry, online
  • do Carmo, Manfredo P., Differentialgeometrie von Kurven und Flächen, Vieweg+Teubner
  • Bär, Christian, Elementare Differentialgeometrie, De Gruyter

Bemerkungen

Das Seminar richtet sich an Lehramtsstudierende.

Tag und Uhrzeit des Seminars können bei Bedarf noch geändert werden.

­

Spectral Methods

Dozent: Dr. Leon Escobar
Beginn: Mittwoch, den 18. Oktober 2017
Ort: Hörsaal N16
Zeit: Mittwoch, 16-18 Uhr

Beschreibung
 

Spectral methods are powerful mathematical techniques used for the solution of partial differential
equations. Unlike the local approaches, as the finite difference methods or finite elements, spectral
methods are global methods where the computation at any given point depends not only on
information at neighboring points, but on information from the entire domain. A remarkable fact is
that under suitable conditions, spectral methods converge exponentially, which makes them more
accurate than local methods. In this course, we will give an introduction to this kind of methods
laying special emphasis on their practical implementation to the solution of partial differential
equations from the field of the mathematical physics.

Vorraussetzungen

Basic knowledge on partial differential equations, numerical methods and some programming
language, preferable MATLAB.

Literatur

L. N. Trefethen Spectral methods in MATLAB, Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, 2000.
J. S. Hesthaven; S. Gottlieb; D. Gottlied, Spectral methods for time-dependent problems, vol.~21, Cambridge University Press, 2007.

Studien- und Prüfungsleistungen

There will be an individual assignment which will be worth half of the final mark. The other half
will be determined by an oral exam.

Sommersemester 2017

Vortragsreihe - Deformation of metrics towards constant scalar curvature

Dozent: Prof. Dr. Simon Brendle

Beschreibung

The classical uniformization theorem asserts that any Riemannian metric on a closed two-
dimensional surface is conformal to a metric of constant Gaussian curvature. A higher dimensio-
nal analogue of this statement is given by the solution of the Yamabe problem: Any metric on
an n-dimensional manifold is conformal to a metric of constant scalar curvature. This problem
is equivalent to the existence of a positive solution of the nonlinear elliptic equation of the form

In this lectures, I will describe the background of this problem, and its variational formulation
in terms of the Yamabe functional. The gradient flow associated with the Yamabe functional
leads to an curvature flow, and I will discuss why this flow converges to a metric of constant
scalar curvature for any initial metric.

­

Introduction to Numerical Relativity

Dozent: Dr. Leon Escobar
Beginn: Freitag, 21. April 2017
Zeit: Freitags, 10 Uhr c. t. bis 12 Uhr,
Ort: N14

Beschreibung

The cornerstone of the general relativity theory is the Einstein’s field equation which describes the gravitational field as result of the interaction between the curvature of the space-time and its energy content. In general, this equation consists of ten coupled non-linear partial differential equations which are, with exception of some few cases, hard to be solved simultaneously. The numerical relativity emerges as a response for dealing with such complexity by introducing analytical and numerical techniques that makes possible solving the equations in a large variety of situations. The purpose of this lecture is to provide a basic introduction to this subject. In the first part, the geometric 3 + 1-decomposition of the space-time will be introduced as well as the most used approaches for solving the resulting equations. In the second part, it will be presented the standard approaches for the construction of initial data and the choice of suitable coordinates. The course finishes by discussing, in the 3 + 1-decomposition context, the equations that model the most common energy sources, namely; dust, a perfect gas, scalar and electromagnetic fields.

Voraussetzungen

One lecture in differential geometry and numerical methods as well as a very basic knowledge of some programming language.

Literatur

  •  
  • M. Alcubierre, Introduction to 3 + 1 Numerical Relativity, Oxford Science Publications, 2008.
  • T. W. Baumgarte and S. L. Shapiro, Numerical Relativity: Solving Einstein’s Equations on the Computer, Cambridge University Press, 2010.
  • E. Gourgoulhon, 3+1 Formalism in General Relativity: Bases of Numerical Relativity, vol 846, Springer Science and Business Media, 2012.

Modulhandbuch

ECTS Punkte: 3
Prüfungsgebiet: Angewandte Mathematik

Studien- und Prüfungsleistungen

There will be an individual assignment which will be worth half of the final mark. The other half will be determined by an oral exam.

­

Lineare Partielle Differentialgleichungen

Dozent: Dr. Martin Kell
Beginn: Montag, 19. April 2017
Zeit: Montags und Mittwochs, 14:15 Uhr  bis 15:45 Uhr;
Ort: Hörsaal N15

Beschreibung

In dieser Vorlesung werden Grundlagen zur Theorie partieller Differentialgleichungen erarbeitet. Dazu wird die Lösungs- und Regularitätstheorie linearer partieller Differentialgleichungen entwickelt, der Fokus wird auf elliptischen Differentialgleichungen liegen, je nach Zeit werden auch parabolische Gleichungen betrachtet. Unter anderem werden folgende Themen behandelt: Harmonische Funktionen, Maximumprinzipien, Sobolev-Räume, L²-Theorie, Schauder-Abschätzungen, Harnack-Ungleichungen, Hölder-Regularität.

The exercise sessions will be held in English. Depending on the preference of all participants there is a possibility to have English-only lectures. Participants who prefer English may contact me via e-mail before the first lecture.

Voraussetzungen

Grundvorlesungen in Analysis und Linearer Algebra

Hilfreich aber nicht notwendig: Funktionalanalysis

Literatur (Beispiele)

  • D. Gilbarg und N.S. Trudinger, Elliptic Partial Differential Equations of Second Order, Springer-Verlag, 1998.
  • L.C. Evans, Partial Differential Equations, American Mathematical Society, 1998.

Modulhandbuch

ECTS Punkte: 10
Prüfungsgebiet: Reine Mathematik

Studien- und Prüfungsleistungen

Für die Zulassung zur Prüfung werden 50% der Übungspunkte benötigt. Je nach Größe der Veranstaltung gibt es eine Klausur oder mündliche Prüfung.

Übungen (werden auf Englisch abgehandelt)

Assistent: Jason Ledwidge
Zeit: TBA
Ort: TBA

Wintersemester 2016/17

Vortragsreihe - Evolution by Curvature

Dozent: Prof. Dr. Simon Brendle

Freitag, 16. Dezember 2016 10 Uhr c.t.-12 N16
Mittwoch, 21. Dezember 2016 14 Uhr c.t.-16 N16
Donnerstag, 12. Januar 2017 14 Uhr c.t.-16 N16

Beschreibung

We will discuss recent advances on singularity formation in geometric flows. In particular, we plan to consider fully nonlinear flows where the speed is a nonlinear function of the curvature eigenvalues. An interesting class of examples are flows for convex hypersurfaces with speed given by a power of the Gaussian curvature. The asymptotic behavior of these flows is by now well understood, and depends in a subtle way on the exponent. The main tools are a classification of self-similar solutions, as well as a monotonicity formula for an entropy functional.

­

Geometrische Evolutionsgleichungen

Dozent: Prof. Dr. Gerhard Huisken
Beginn: Freitag, 21. Oktober 2016
Zeit: Freitag, 10 Uhr c.t. bis 12 Uhr;
Ort: Hörsaal N16 (M3)

Beschreibung

Die Vorlesung beschäftigt sich mit Systemen parabolischer partieller Differentialgleichungen, die die Deformation geometrischer Strukturen beschreiben. Beispiele sind der Fluss von Hyperflächen in Richtung ihres mittleren Krümmungsvektors und der Fluss Riemannscher Metriken in Richtung der Ricci Krümmung. Die Vorlesung entwickelt analytische Techniken zum Verständnis der geometrischen Eigenschaften dieser Flüsse und beweist Resultate zum lokalen und globalen Verhalten der Lösungen, mit Anwendungen auf verschiedene geometrische Fragestellungen.

Voraussetzungen

Je eine Vorlesung über Partielle Differentialgleichungen und Differentialgeometrie

Literatur (Beispiele)

  • Klaus Ecker, Regularity theory of mean curvature flows, Birkhäuser Verlag Basel, 1984.
  • Simon BrendleRicci Flow and the Sphere Theorem, Graduate Studies in Mathematics -- AMS, 2010.

Modulhandbuch

Modulcode: 3215
ECTS Punkte: 4 (Bachelor/Master), 3 (Lehramt)
Prüfungsgebiet: Reine Mathematik

Studien- und Prüfungsleistungen

Je nach Größe der Veranstaltung gibt es eine Klausur oder mündliche Prüfung.

­

 

Mathematische Relativitätstheorie

Dozentin: JProf. Dr. Carla Cederbaum
Beginn: Mittwoch, 19. Oktober 2016
Zeit: Mittwoch, 10 Uhr c.t. bis 12 Uhr;
Ort: Hörsaal N08

Beschreibung

Nach einer kurzen Einführung in die spezielle Relativitätstheorie und die ihr zugrunde liegende Geometrie der Minkowski-Raumzeit werden wir uns mit allgemeinen Lorentz-Mannigfaltigkeiten und den Einstein-Gleichungen der Allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie (ART) befassen. Ein Teil der Vorlesung wird sich auf statische (unbewegte) Lösungen der Einstein-Gleichungen konzentrieren.
Diese haben eine besonders einfache geometrische Struktur und eignen sich für einen ersten Kontakt mit geometrischen, analytischen und physikalischen Fragen über Raumzeiten und isolierte Systeme.
Des Weiteren werden wir uns mit der Beschreibung und Untersuchung von kosmologischen Modellen und isolierten Systemen wie etwa Sternen und schwarzen Löchern beschäftigen.

Voraussetzungen

Analysis 1-3, Lineare Algebra 1-2 und Differentialgeometrie oder Mathematische Physik: Klassische Mechanik

Hilfreich aber nicht notwenig: Elliptische Differentialgleichungen

Literatur (Beispiele)

  • R. M. Wald, General Relativity, The University of Chicago Press, 1984
  • H. Fisher und H. Kaul, Mathematik für Physiker, Band 3, Springer Spektrum, 3.~Auflage, 2013.
  • B. O’Neill, Semi-Riemannian Geometry With Applications to Relativity, Academic Press 103, 1983.
  • S. W. Hawking und G. F. R. Ellis, The large scale structure of space-time, Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics, 1973.
  • C. Cederbaum, The Newtonian Limit of Geometrostatics, FU Berlin, 2012.

Modulhandbuch

ECTS Punkte: 7
Prüfungsgebiet: Angewandte und reine Mathematik

Studien- und Prüfungsleistungen

Für die Zulassung zur Prüfung werden 50% der Übungspunkte inclusiv der Projektarbeiten benötigt. Je nach Größe der Veranstaltung gibt es eine Klausur oder mündliche Prüfung.

Übungen

Assistent: Florian Johne
Zeit: Freitag, 14 c.t. bis 16 Uhr
Ort: Raum N16 (M3)

­

Lorentzsche Geometrie (Seminar)

Dozentin: JProf. Dr. Carla Cederbaum
Assistentin: Sophia Jahns
Art der Veranstaltung: Blocksemiar
Datum: 5. bis 8. Oktober 2016

Beschreibung

In der Lorentzschen Geometrie untersucht man glatte Mannigfaltigkeiten, die eine so genannte Lorentzsche Metrik besitzen. Das einfachste Beispiel für eine solche Lorentzsche Mannigfaltigkeit ist der Minkowski-Raum (R4,η)

der Speziellen Relativitätstheorie, wobei η eine nicht-ausgeartete symmetrische Bilinearform mit Signatur (,+,+,+) auf R4

ist. Allgemeine Lorentzsche Mannigfaltigkeiten spielen in der Allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie eine zentrale Rolle, sind aber auch rein mathematisch sehr interessant und haben viele überraschende geometrische Eigenschaften.

Wir werden zunächst die Geometrie des Minkowski-Raums kennenlernen und uns dann allgemeinen Lorentzschen Mannigfaltigkeiten widmen. Hier werden wir einige interessante Beispiele studieren (Schwarzschild-Raumzeit, de Sitter-Raumzeit und anti-de Sitter-Raumzeit). Ein Ziel des Seminars ist es auch, das Singularitätentheorem von Roger Penrose zu beweisen.

Aufbauend auf dem Seminar können Bachelor- und Zulassungsarbeiten vergeben werden.

Voraussetzungen

Grundvorlesungen sowie Grundkenntnisse in Differentialgeometrie, etwa aus der Vorlesung "Mathematische Physik: Klassische Mechanik"

Literatur (Beispiele)

  • Christian Bär, Lorentzgeometrie, Skript, 2004
  • John M. Lee, Riemannian Manifolds: an Introduction to Curvature, Springer, 1997.
  • Barrett O’Neill, Semi-Riemannian Geometry With Applications to Relativity, Academic Press, 1983.
  • Robert M. Wald, General Relativity, The University of Chicago Press, 1984

­

Theorie des optimalen Transports

Dozent: Dr. Martin Kell
Beginn: Montag, 17. Oktober 2016
Zeit: Montags und Mittwochs, 14:15 Uhr  bis 15:45 Uhr;
Ort: Hörsaal N08

Beschreibung

Wie bewegt man möglichst kostengünstig eine Masse zu einer vorgegebenen Ziel-Verteilung? Kann dies immer mit Transportabbildungen erreicht werden? Dies sind die zentralen Fragen in der Theorie des optimalen Transports. In der Vorlesung werden zunächst Grundlagen zur Existenz von Minimierern von Transportproblemen erarbeitet und deren Eigenschaften untersucht. Dazu spielen Lösungen von Dualproblemen eine zentrale Rolle. Aufbauend darauf wird eine geodätische Distanzfunktion auf dem Raum der Maße definiert, mit welcher man Volumenverzerrungen und Konvexität von Entropiefunktionalen zeigen kann. Am Beispiel von log-konkaven Maßen in genormten Räumen werden aus solchen Charakterisierungen  analytische und geometrische Ungleichungen hergeleitet. Je nach verfügbarer Restzeit und Interesse der Teilnehmer werden weitere Anwendung der Theorie des optimalen Transports behandelt.

Voraussetzungen

Grundvorlesungen in Analysis und Linearer Algebra

Hilfreich aber nicht notwendig: Differentialgeometrie

Literatur (Beispiele)

  • L. Ambrosio  und N. Gigli, A User's Guide to Optimal Transport, in Modelling and Optimisation of Flows on Networks, Springer-Verlag, 2013.
  • C. Villani, Optimal Transport, Old and New, Springer Verlag, 2009.
  • C. Villani, Topics in Optimal Transportation, AMS, 2003.

Modulhandbuch

ECTS Punkte: 10
Prüfungsgebiet: Angewandte und reine Mathematik

Studien- und Prüfungsleistungen

Für die Zulassung zur Prüfung werden 50% der Übungspunkte benötigt. Je nach Größe der Veranstaltung gibt es eine Klausur oder mündliche Prüfung.

Übungen

Assistent: Felix Dietrich
Zeit: TBA
Ort: TBA

­

In Ausstellungen Mathematik erklären

 

Dozentinnen: JProf. Dr. Carla Cederbaum und Sophia Jahns
Zeitraum: am 14.1.2017 ganztägig (6h+Mittagspause), am 19.1.2017 nachmittags/abends (6h)
ECTS-Punkte: 3 (unbenotet)

Beschreibung:

Am 19.01.2017 wird im C-Bau eine mathematische Dauerausstellung eröffnet, die sowohl physische Exponate und Poster als auch einen Touch Screen Computer mit einfach zu bedienender Software zur Illustration von mathematischen Themen enthält. Im Rahmen der Lehrveranstaltung lernen Sie diese Exponate und Software kennen, vor allem aber lernen Sie, wie man die dahinter stehende Mathematik einem allgemeinen Publikum näher bringt.

Der erste Teil des Seminars setzt sich zusammen aus praktischen Übungen zum Mathematik-Erklären im speziellen Setting einer Ausstellung sowie kurzen Theorie-Einheiten über ausgewählte Exponate und Software. Im Vorfeld erhalten alle Teilnehmer*innen einen Reader, den sie bis zur Veranstaltung gelesen haben sollen. Alle Teilnehmer*innen erstellen ein Protokoll eines Teiles dieses Kurses.

Der zweite Teil des Seminars findet großteils während der Ausstellungseröffnung statt: Sie werden die Ausstellung betreuen und den Besucher*innen wie vorher geübt die Exponate und Software erklären.

In Einzelfällen besteht im Anschluss an das Seminar zu verschiedenen Zeitpunkten die Möglichkeit, Schulklassen durch die Ausstellung zu führen.

 

Voraussetzungen:

-Analysis 1&2, Lineare Algebra 1&2, sowie idealerweise Algebra oder Geometrie oder Differentialgeometrie oder Klassische Mechanik

- Freude am Erklären von Mathematik und im Umgang mit Menschen.

­

Teaching Mathematics: A two-day course for doctoral candidates and postdocs

Dozent: JProf. Dr. Carla Cederbaum
Zeit: Tuesday, 21. February 2017 and Wednesday, 22. February 2017
Ort: Hörsaal N14

Contents

  • introduction to pedagogy and didactics
  • analysis of different teaching styles
  • scientific foundation of and evidence based teaching
  • teaching and learning
  • target groups/different audiences
  • diversity as a chance/problem
  • self efficacy, agency
  • problem based learning
  • special aspects of learning mathematics
  • teaching identity and individual strategies


Everyone has their own ideas about how to teach mathematics. You have probably encountered many different styles of teaching from the student’s perspective, and maybe you have also had the opportunity of trying out some from the teacher’s side. In this seminar, we will compare different approaches to teaching, find out which ones work (for you) and which ones do not, and discuss pitfalls and commonly made “mistakes”. You will get to know some modern instruction methods and techniques relying on evidence based educational theory as we go along. Most of the seminar will be ’hands on’ meaning that you will get to teach yourself, get feedback, try again and learn from the experience.

Remarks
If there are no non-German speaking participants, the course can be held in German.
The number of participants is limited to 12.

Am 19.01.2017 wird im C-Bau eine mathematische Dauerausstellung eröffnet, die sowohl  physische Exponate und Poster als auch einen Touch Screen Computer mit einfach zu bedienender Software zur Illustration von mathematischen Themen enthält. Im Rahmen der Lehrveranstaltung lernen Sie diese Exponate und Software kennen, vor allem aber lernen Sie, wie man die dahinter stehende Mathematik einem allgemeinen Publikum näher bringt.

Sommersemester 2016

Vortragsreihe - Partial Differential Equations in Geometry

Dozent: Prof. Dr. Simon Brendle

Beschreibung

A central theme in geometry is the study of manifolds and their curvature. In this lecture series, we will discuss how techniques involving partial differential equations have shed light on several longstanding problems in global differential geometry. In particular, we will focus on the geometry of hypersurfaces, and discuss the isoperimetric inequalities, Alexandrov’s theorem on embedded surfaces in Rn of constant mean curvature, as well as our proof of Lawson’s 1969 conjecture concerning embedded minimal tori in S3. Time permitting, I will discuss some recent results on the classification of self-similar solutions to geometric flows.

­

Sobolevräume und Anwendungen

Dozent: Prof. Dr. Gerhard Huisken
Beginn: Freitag, 15. April 2016
Zeit: Freitag, 10 Uhr c.t. bis 12 Uhr;
Ort: Hörsaal N16 (M3)

Beschreibung

Die Vorlesung führt das Konzept schwacher Ableitungen von Lebesgue-integrierbaren Funktionen ein und entwickelt die grundlegenden Eigenschaften der zugehörigen Funktionenräume, der Sobolev-Räume. Als Anwendung werden lineare elliptische partielle Differentialgleichungen wie zum Beispiel die Laplace- und Poissongleichung in diesen Räumen in schwacher Form gelöst und die zentralen Eigenschaften solcher Lösungen hergeleitet.

Voraussetzungen

Grundvorlesungen Analysis I,II, Lineare Algebra I,II, Lesbesgue-Integral

Literatur (Beispiele)

  • William P. Ziemer, Weakly differentiable functions, Springer
  • Neil S. Trudinger & David Gilbarg, Elliptic partial differential equations of second order, chapter 7,8; Springer Grundlehren
  • Lawrence C. Evans, Partial Differential Equations, chapters on Sobolev Spaces and elliptc PDEs, American Math. Society
  • Adams and Fournier, Sobolev spaces, Academic Press

Modulhandbuch

Modulcode: 3215
ECTS Punkte: 6 (Bachelor/Master), 6 (Lehramt)
Prüfungsgebiet: Reine Mathematik

Studien- und Prüfungsleistungen

Übungsschein als Prüfungsvoraussetzung, Prüfungsleistung je nach Teilnehmerzahl schriftlich oder mündlich.

Übungen

Assistent: Florian Johne
Zeit: Montag, 14-16 Uhr
Ort: Raum S11 (6.Stock, C-Bau)

­

Lorentzsche Geometrie (Seminar)

Dozentin: JProf. Dr. Carla Cederbaum
Assistentin: TBA
Vorbesprechung: Montag, 8. Februar 2016, 15:15 Uhr
Datum: Wird bei der Vorbesprechung festgelegt
Ort: Wird bei der Vorbesprechung festgelegt

Beschreibung

In der Lorentzschen Geometrie untersucht man glatte Mannigfaltigkeiten, die eine so genannte Lorentzsche Metrik besitzen. Das einfachste Beispiel für eine solche Lorentzsche Mannigfaltigkeit ist der Minkowski-Raum (R4,η)

der Speziellen Relativitätstheorie, wobei η eine nicht-ausgeartete symmetrische Bilinearform mit Signatur (,+,+,+) auf R4

ist. Allgemeine Lorentzsche Mannigfaltigkeiten spielen in der Allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie eine zentrale Rolle, sind aber auch rein mathematisch sehr interessant und haben viele überraschende geometrische Eigenschaften.

Wir werden zunächst die Geometrie des Minkowski-Raums kennenlernen und uns dann allgemeinen Lorentzschen Mannigfaltigkeiten widmen. Hier werden wir einige interessante Beispiele studieren (Schwarzschild-Raumzeit, de Sitter-Raumzeit und anti-de Sitter-Raumzeit). Ein Ziel des Seminars ist es auch, das Singularitätentheorem von Roger Penrose zu beweisen.

Aufbauend auf dem Seminar können Bachelor- und Zulassungsarbeiten vergeben werden.

Voraussetzungen

Grundvorlesungen sowie Grundkenntnisse in Differentialgeometrie, etwa aus der Vorlesung "Mathematische Physik: Klassische Mechanik"

Literatur (Beispiele)

  • Christian Bär, Lorentzgeometrie, Skript, 2004
  • John M. Lee, Riemannian Manifolds: an Introduction to Curvature, Springer, 1997.
  • Barrett O’Neill, Semi-Riemannian Geometry With Applications to Relativity, Academic Press, 1983.
  • Robert M. Wald, General Relativity, The University of Chicago Press, 1984

Wintersemester 2015/16

Ricci-Krümmung und Geometrie Riemannscher Mannigfaltigkeiten

Dozent: Prof. Dr. Gerhard Huisken
Beginn: Freitag, 16. Oktober 2015
Zeit: Freitag, 10 Uhr c.t. bis 12 Uhr;
Ort: Hörsaal N14 (M1)

Beschreibung

In der Vorlesung wird dargestellt, in welcher Weise die Ricci-Krümmung einer Riemannschen Mannigfaltigkeit die Geometrie, Topologie und Analysis der Mannigfaltigkeit beeinflusst. Insbesondere sollen klassische Vergleichssätze im Zusammenhang mit der Distanzfunktion und dem Laplace Operator bewiesen werden. Auch neuere Ergebnisse zu Diffusionsprozessen auf Mannigfaltigkeiten nicht-negativer Ricci-Krümmung sollen behandelt werden.

Voraussetzungen

  • Differentialgeometrie im Umfang einer 4 stündigen Vorlesung
  • Partiellen Differentialgleichungen im Umfang einer 4 stündigen Vorlesung

Literatur (Beispiele)

  • Christian Bär, Elementare Differentialgeometrie, de Gruyter Lehrbuch
  • Manfredo do Carmo, Differentialgeometrie von Kurven und Flächen, Vieweg Studium
  • Manfredo do Carmo, Riemannian Geometry, Birkhäuser
  • Sylvestre Gallot, Dominique Hulin, Jacques Lafontaine, Riemannian Geometry, Springer
  • David Gilbarg, Neil Trudinger, Elliptic Partial Differential Equations of Second Order, Springer, 3rd ed.
  • Jürgen Jost, Riemannian Geometry and Geometric Analysis
  • Barrett O'Neill: Semi-Riemannian Geometry With Applications to Relativity, Academic Press, Mathematics 103
  • Richard Schoen, Shing-Tung Yau, Lectures on Differential Geometry, International Press, aus "Conference Proceedings and Lecture Notes in Geometry and Topology", Volume I, 1994
  • Michael Spivak, A comprehensive introduction to differential geometry, Vol. I-V, Publish or Perish.

Modulhandbuch

Modulcode: 3255
ECTS Punkte: 4 (Bachelor/Master), 3 (Lehramt)
Prüfungsgebiet: Reine Mathematik

Studien- und Prüfungsleistungen

Prüfungsleistung mündlich.

­

Fixpunktsätze (Proseminar, Blockveranstaltung)

Dozentin: Dr. Carla Cederbaum
Assistentin: Sophia Jahns Sophia Jahns
Vorbesprechung: Dienstag, 21.07.2014, 12:30 im N15
Datum: Sonntag, 21.02.2015 bis Mittwoch, 24.02.2016, ganztägig
Ort: Gästehaus der Universität; Blaubeuren
Scheinkriterium: tbp

Beschreibung

Ein Fixpunktsatz ist ein Satz, der unter gewissen Voraussetzungen die Existenz eines Fixpunktes einer Abbildung eines Raumes auf sich garantiert. Im ersten Teil des Seminars werden wir uns mit dem Banachschen Fixpunktsatz befassen. Als seine wichtigste Anwendung werden wir den Satz von Picard-Lindelöf kennenlernen, der eine Aussage über die Existenz von Lösungen gewöhnlicher Differentialgleichungen macht. Der zweite Teil des Proseminars beschäftigt sich mit dem Brouwerschen Fixpunktsatz, für den wir zwei unterschiedliche Beweise kennenlernen werden. Die Vorträge werden durch eine praktische Übung ergänzt.

Das Proseminar findet als Blockveranstaltung im Gästehaus der Universität Tübingen in Blaubeuren
statt. Die Anmeldung findet in der Vorbesprechung statt.

Voraussetzungen

  • Lineare Algebra 1-2
  • Analsysis 1

Literatur (Beispiele)

  • Martin Aigner; Günther Ziegler, Das BUCH der Beweise, Heidelberg u.a. : Springer, 2010
  • Horst Belkner, Metrische Räume, Leipzig : Teubner, 1972
  • Carla Cederbaum, Illustration des Banachschen Fixpunktsatzes anhand von Landkarten
  • Allen Hatcher, Algebraic Topology, Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2001
  • Harro Heuser, Lehrbuch der Analysis 1, Stuttgart : Teubner, 1980
  • Harro Heuser, Lehrbuch der Analysis 2, Stuttgart : Teubner, 1981
  • Harro Heuser, Funktionalanalysis, Wiesbaden : Teubner, 2006
  • Josef Naas, Tutschke, Wolfgang: Große Sätze und schöne Beweise der Mathematik, Thun/Frankfurt a.M. : Harri Deutsch, 1989
  • Erich Ossa, Topologie, Braunschweig/Wiesbaden : Vieweg, 1992
  • François Rouvière, Petit guide de calcul différentiel, Paris : Cassini, 1999
  • Josef Stoer; Roland Bulirsch, Numerische Mathematik, Berlin, Heidelberg : Springer, 1994
  • Wikipedia, Französische Eisenbahnmetrik

Sommersemester 2015

Allgemeine Relativitätstheorie

Dozenten: Prof. Dr. Gerhard Huisken, Dr. Carla Cederbaum
Zeit: Mittwoch, 16 Uhr c.t. bis 18 Uhr
 

       Freitag, 10 Uhr c.t. bis 11:45 Uhr
Ort: Hörsaal N16 (M3)

Beschreibung

Nach einer Einführung in die spezielle Relativitätstheorie und die ihr zugrunde liegende Geometrie der Minkowski-Raumzeit werden wir uns mit allgemeinen Lorentz-Mannigfaltigkeiten und den Einstein-Gleichungen der Allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie befassen. Ein Teil der Vorlesung (Cederbaum, Mittwochs) wird sich auf statische (unbewegte) Lösungen der Einstein-Gleichungen konzentrieren. Diese haben eine besonders einfache geometrische Struktur und eignen sich für einen ersten Kontakt mit geometrischen, analytischen und physikalischen Fragen über Raumzeiten und isolierte Systeme. Der andere Teil der Vorlesung (Huisken, Freitags) wird untersuchen, mit welchen geometrischen und analytischen Strukturen man in allgemeineren Raumzeiten, die entweder bei kosmologischen Modellen oder bei der Beschreibung von isolierten Phänomenen wie Sternen, schwarzen Löchern oder von Gravitationswellen auftreten, klassische  physikalische Konzepte innerhalb der Allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie beschreiben kann.

Voraussetzungen

  • Analysis 1-3
  • Lineare Algebra 1-2
  • Differentialgeometrie
  • optional, aber hilfreich: Elliptische Differentialgleichungen

Literatur (Beispiele)

  • R. M. Wald, General Relativity, The University of Chicago Press (1984)
  • H. Fischer und H. Kaul, Mathematik für Physiker, Band 3, Springer Spektrum, 3.~Auflage (2013)
  • B. O'Neill, Semi-Riemannian Geometry With Applications to Relativity, Academic Press, Mathematics 103
  • S. W. Hawking and G. F. R. Ellis, The large scale structure of space-time, Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics (1973)
  • S. Axler, P. Bourdon and W. Ramey, Harmonic Function Theory, Springer, New York, Graduate Texts in Mathematics (1992)
  • C. Cederbaum, The Newtonian Limit of Geometrostatics, FU Berlin (2012)

Modulhandbuch

Modulcode: 2315
ECTS Punkte: 10
Prüfungsgebiet: Reine und Angewandte Mathematik

Studien- und Prüfungsleistungen

Übungsschein als Prüfungsvoraussetzung, Prüfungsleistung je nach Teilnehmerzahl schriftlich oder mündlich.

Übungsgruppen und Übungen

Sophia Jahns, Dienstag, 16-18 Uhr, S9. Sprechstunde nach Vereinbarung. E-Mail senden

Übungsblätter sind im ILIAS zu finden.

­

Analysis auf Vektorbündeln

Dozent: Dr. Christopher Nerz
Zeit: Mittwoch, 14:15-16:00
Raum: Hörsaal N8

Beschreibung

Die Vorlesung richtet sich an Hörer der Differentialgeometrie des WiSe 2014/15 oder einer äquivalenten Vorlesung und gibt eine Einführung in die Vektorbündel- und Hodge-Theorie. Insbesondere sollen behandelt werden:

  • Vektorbündel: Einführung, Kovariante Ableitung, Holonomie, Paralleltransport, Riemann-Krümmung, äußere Ableitung
  • Hodge-Theorie: Einführung, Poincaré-Dualität

Motivation: Aus der Differentialgeometrie Vorlesung ist bekannt, dass für jeden Punkt pM

einer glatten Mannigfaltigkeit M der Tangentialraum TpM existiert. Dieser ist ein Vektorraum, der "glatt vom Punkt pM" abhängt. Das Tangentialbündel TM ist nun die Menge all dieser Tangentialräume, d.h. TM:=p˙TpM. Wir können dieses als eine "Zuordnung" verstehen, die jedem Punkt p der Mannigfaltigkeit M den Vektorraum TpM zuordnet. Man kann nun zeigen, dass dieses Bündel mit einer kanonischen Mannigfaltigkeitsstruktur versehen werden kann, selbst also eine Mannigfaltigkeit ist. Bezüglich dieser Mannigfaltigkeitsstruktur stellt sich die Abbildung π:TMM als glatt heraus, wobei π durch π1(p)=TpM charakterisiert ist -- dies erklärt die oben erwähnte "glatte Abhängigkeit" des Vektorraums TpM vom Punkt pM

.

Analog können wir andere Bündel EM

konstruieren, d.h. Mannigfaltigkeiten, die in vergleichbarer Weise als "Zuordnungen" verstanden werden können, die jedem Punkt pM der zugrunde liegenden Mannigfaltigkeit M in glatter Weise einen Vektorraum EpE zuordnet, wobei E gerade die Vereinigung dieser Vektorräume ist, d.h. E=p˙Ep

. Wir werden sehen, dass wir einige dieser Bündel bereits aus der Differentialgeometrie Vorlesungen kennen und bereits verwendet haben (Stichworte: Metrik, erste und zweite Fundamentalform, Krümmungstensor, ...).

Da diese Bündel wiederum Mannigfaltigkeiten sind, werden wir auch dort kovariante Ableitungen betrachten, wie wir es bereits auf Mannigfaltigkeiten gemacht haben (Stichwort Christoffelsymbole).

Voraussetzungen

  • Analysis 1-2
  • Lineare Algebra 1-2
  • Differentialgeometrie (oder eine andere einführende Veranstaltung zur Differentialgeometrie)

Hinweis

Es wird von den Studenten die Bereitschaft erwartet, sich während des Semesters weiteres, kleines Grundwissen selbst zu erarbeiten (Stichworte: Grundlagen der Topologie sowie Multilineare Abbildungen, Tensor-/Wedge-Produkt und ähnliche Konstruktionen der linearen Algebra) -- natürlich unter rechtzeitiger Angabe geeigneter Literatur.

Literatur (Beispiele)

  • John M. Lee, Introduction to smooth manifolds (insb. Kap. 5 und 11-12)
  • John M. Lee, Manifolds and Differential Geometry (insb. Kap. 6-8 und 10)
  • Christopher Nerz, Skriptum: Einführung in die Differentialgeometrie (insb. Kap. IV-V und VIII-X sowie Anh. B)

Modulhandbuch

Modulcode: 3255
ECTS Punkte: 4
Prüfungsgebiet: Reine Mathematik

Studien- und Prüfungsgebiet

Es werden schriftliche Übungsaufgaben angeboten, deren Abgabe nicht Zulassungskriterium für die Prüfungsleistung sind, aber deren Bearbeitung dringend empfohlen wird. Am Semesterende wird eine (voraussichtlich mündliche) Prüfung stattfinden.

Wintersemester 2014/15

Differentialgeometrie

Dozent: Prof. Dr. Gerhard Huisken
Beginn: Donnerstag, 16. Oktober 2014
Zeit: Donnerstag und Freitag, je 10 Uhr c.t. bis 12 Uhr;
Ort: Hörsaal N14 (M1)
Ankündigung

Beschreibung

Die Vorlesung gibt eine Einführung in grundlegende Phänomene und Strukturen der Differentialgeometrie, insbesondere zu

  • Kurven: Krümmung, Torsion, Normalformen
  • Hyperflächen: Tangentialbündel, Erste und zweite Fundamentalform, mittlere Krümmung, Gauss-Krümmung, Minimalflächen, Fundamentalsatz der Flächentheorie, Gauss-Bonnet
  • Riemannschen Mannigfaltigkeiten: Geodäten, Normalkoordinaten, kovariante Ableitung, Zusammenhänge, Paralleltransport, Riemann- und Ricci-Krümmung.

Im Sommersemester 2015 werden sich voraussichtlich eine 4-stündige Vorlesung über "Mathematische Aspekte der Allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie" sowie eine 2-stündige Vorlesung über weitere Phänomene und Strukturen der Differentialgeometrie ("Analysis auf Vektorbündeln") anschließen.

Voraussetzungen

  • Analysis 1-2
  • Lineare Algebra 1-2

Literatur (Beispiele)

  • C. Bär, Elementare Differentialgeometrie, de Gruyter Lehrbuch.
  • M. do Carmo, Differentialgeometrie von Kurven und Flächen, Vieweg Studium
  • M. do Carmo, Riemannian Geometry, Birkhäuser
  • M. Spivak, A comprehensive introduction to differential geometry, Vol. I-V, Publish or Perish.
  • S. Gallot, D. Hulin, J. Lafontaine, Riemannian Geometry, Springer.

Modulhandbuch

Modulcode: 3215
ECTS Punkte: 10
Prüfungsgebiet: Reine Mathematik

Studien- und Prüfungsleistungen

Übungsschein als Prüfungsvoraussetzung, Prüfungsleistung schriftlich (90 Minuten), als Klausur am 13. Februar 2015, 10 Uhr c.t. bis 12 Uhr im N14 (M1).

Übungsgruppen und Übungen

  • Niklas Kulke, Dienstag 16-18 Uhr, S6
  • Christopher Nerz, Mittwoch 16-18 Uhr, D4A19

­

Fixpunktsätze (Proseminar, Blockveranstaltung)

Dozentin: Dr. Carla Cederbaum
Assistentin: Sophia Jahns
Zeit: 2.-5. März 2015 (Blockveranstaltung)
Ort: Freudenstadt
Vorbesprechung: 17. Juli 2014, 13:15 im N15 (M2). Ersatzweise per e-Mail an die Dozentinnen unter Angabe von Fachsemesteranzahl, Studiengang und bereits besuchten Veranstaltungen.
Scheinkriterium: Vortrag (60-75 Minuten) mit vorheriger Absprache mit den Dozentinnen sowie ein Handout (1-2 Seiten, DinA4, LaTeX)
Ankündigung

Beschreibung

Ein Fixpunkt p einer Abbildung f:XX ist ein Punkt, der auf sich selbst abgebildet wird, also f(p)=p erfüllt. Entsprechend ist ein Fixpunktsatz ein Satz, der unter gewissen Voraussetzungen an die Abbildung f (und den Raum X) die Existenz eines Fixpunktes garantiert.

Im ersten Teil des Proseminars werden wir uns mit dem Banachschen Fixpunktsatz befassen. Als seine wichtigste Anwendung werden wir den Satz von Picard-Lindelöf kennenlernen, der eine Aussage über die Existenz von Lösungen gewöhnlicher Differentialgleichungen macht.

Der zweite Teil des Proseminars beschäftigt sich mit dem Brouwerschen Fixpunktsatz, für den wir zwei unterschiedliche Beweise kennenlernen werden.

Die Vorträge werden durch eine praktische Übung ergänzt.

Voraussetzungen

  • Lineare Algebra 1 und 2
  • Analysis 1

Unterlagen zum Proseminar

  • Literatur und Vortragseinteilung [pdf]
  • Illustration des Banachschen Fixpunktsatzes anhand von Landkarten [pdf]
  • Anleitung zur Vorbereitung [pdf]
  • Feedbackbogen [pdf]

Sommersemester 2014

Fluss entlang der mittleren Krümmung (Vorlesung)

Dozent: Prof. Dr. Gerhard Huisken
Zeit: Freitag, 10 Uhr c.t. bis 12 Uhr
Ort: Hörsaal M1 (N14)

Beschreibung

Die Vorlesung führt ein in die Bewegung von Flächen entlang ihrer mittleren Krümmung und beweist zentrale Eigenschaften dieser Deformation.

Voraussetzungen

Grundkenntnisse der Differentialgeometrie von Hyperflächen und (linearer) partieller Differ­en­tial­gleich­ungen. Kenntnisse zu nichtlinearen partiellen Differentialgleichungen sind nützlich, werden aber nicht vorausgesetzt

Literatur

K. Ecker, Regularity theory for mean curvature flow, Springer 2004

­

Geometrische Variationsprobleme (Seminar)

Titel: Das Yamabe-Problem (Seminar)
Dozent: Prof. Dr. Gerhard Huisken
Zeit: Freitag, 10 Uhr c.t. bis 12 Uhr
Ort: Hörsaal M1 (N14)

Beschreibung

Der Uniformisierungssatz auf Riemannschen Flächen hat in höheren Dimensionen in der konformen Geometrie eine Verallgemeinerung, die zuerst von Yamabe vermutet wurde: Auf einer geschlossenen Riemannschen Mannigfaltigkeit kann die Metrik konform so verändert werden, dass die skalare Krümmung konstant ist. Die Forderung konstanter skalarer Krümmung führt auf eine elliptische partielle Differentialgleichung mit einer Nichtlinearität, deren Behandlung zum Grenzfall der Sobolev-Ungleichungen führt und lokale mit globalen geometrischen Eigenschaften der Mannigfaltigkeit verbindet. Das Seminar soll von den Grundlagen des Problems möglichst weit bis zu der Lösung durch Trudinger, Aubin und Schoen vordringen.

Voraussetzungen

Grundkenntnisse in partiellen Differentialgleichungen und in Differentialgeometrie

Literatur

T. Aubin, Nonlinear Analysis on Manifolds. Monge-Ampere equations, Springer 1982

Wintersemester 2013/14

Minimalflächen (Vorlesung)

Dozent: Prof. Dr. Gerhard Huisken
Beginn: Donnerstag, 18. Oktober 2013
Zeit: Freitag, 10 Uhr c.t. bis 12 Uhr;
Ort: Hörsaal N16 (M3)

Beschreibung

Die Vorlesung behandelt quasilineare elliptische und parabolische partielle Differentialgleichungen, insbesondere auch Eigenschaften des Minimalflächenoperators. Notwendige Elemente der linearen Theorie (Schauder-Abschätzungen und Abschätzungen nach De Giorgi – Nash) werden in der Vorlesung bereitgestellt, bevor die Lösbarkeit quasi-linearer Gleichungen untersucht wird. Ziel ist die Konstruktion von Minimalflächen und allgemeiner Flächen vorgeschriebener mittlerer Krümmung in beliebigen Dimensionen, die sich als Graph einer geeigneten Funktion darstellen lassen.

Voraussetzungen

Inhalt einer 4-Std. Vorlesung "Lineare partielle Differentialgleichungen". Kenntnisse der Differentialgeometrie sind nützlich, aber nicht notwendig.

Literatur

  1. Gilbarg und Trudinger, Elliptic partial differential equations of second order, Springer, 3rd ed.
  2. E. Giusti, Minimal surfaces and functons of bounded variation, Birkhäuser
  3. J. Nitsche, Vorlesungen über Minimalflächen, Springer
  4. U. Dierkes, S. Hildebrandt, F. Sauvigny, Minimal Surfaces, Springer