Bio- and neurofeedback training in a virtual classroom for children with ADHD

This study investigates the effectiveness of a near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS)-based neurofeedback training as well as of an electromyogram (EMG)-based biofeedback training in schoolchildren with ADHD. Both trainings are embedded in an immersive virtual classroom environment.
Various studies suggest that ADHD symptoms of children and adults are associated with neurophysiological impairment in prefrontal cortical areas. This impairment is furthermore related to deficits in self-controlling behaviour and to deficits in executive functioning. Bio- and neurofeedback trainings aim to improve these patients’ self-regulation and thus aim to reduce ADHD symptoms and further related difficulties such as poor academic achievement.
In particular, we are interested in how ADHD symptoms, executive functions and academic achievement change through the training. Additionally, we examine whether training in a virtual environment fosters transfer of acquired self-regulation skills from lab to real life.

Bibliography & Publications

Study Information

For further information for participants, see here.

Project Team

  • Dr. Friederike Blume (Department of School Psychology and LEAD Graduate School & Research Network)
  • Justin Hudak, M.Sc. (Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy and LEAD Graduate School & Research Network)
  • Dr. Thomas Dresler (LEAD Graduate School & Research Network and Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy)
  • Dr. Ann-Christine Ehlis (Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy and LEAD Graduate School & Research Network)
  • Dr. Jan Kühnhausen (Department of School Psychology, LEAD Graduate School & Research Network, and IDeA Centre)
  • Prof. Dr. med. Tobias Renner (Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy and LEAD Graduate School & Research Network)
  • Prof. Dr. Caterina Gawrilow (Department of School Psychology and LEAD Graduate School & Research Network)

Funding

Intramural Research Fund of the LEAD Graduate School & Research Network