IFIB – Interfakultäres Institut für Biochemie

Postdocs

Dr. Susanne Feil

Postdoc

email: susanne.feilspam prevention@uni-tuebingen.de

tel: (+49) 7071 29 -73393

fax: (+49) 7071 29 -3332

room: 415 (second floor)

Susanne Feil studied agricultural sciences at Technische Universität München, Germany, where she also did her PhD thesis. During the PhD project at the Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, she established the first Tamoxifen-inducible Cre mouse line for smooth muscle tissue. This mouse line is now being used by investigators all over the world to study gene functions in smooth muscle cells. After the post doc time in Munich, she moved to Tübingen in 2006 together with her husband Robert Feil. Among other things, she is now working on temporally-controlled cell fate mapping in the mouse.

Dr. Markus Wolters (geb./née Milde)

Postdoc

email: markus.woltersspam prevention@uni-tuebingen.de

tel: (+49) 7071 29 -72458

fax: (+49) 7071 29 -3332

room: 462 (second floor)

Markus Wolters studied Pharmacy at the University of Halle-Wittenberg (Halle a. d. Saale, Germany) and earned his approbation as a pharmacist in 2007. Internships during his studies and practical year raised his interest in cellular signalling processes. His PhD thesis (Würzburg and Marburg, Germany) focussed on the interaction of G-proteins and adenylate cyclase type 5 which he investigated using FRET microscopy. In 2013 he joined the lab of Robert Feil. Among other things, he establishes new tools and experiments to image cGMP in real-time in living cells, tissues and organisms.

Dr. Maria T. Kristina Zaldivia

Postdoc

email: kristina.zaldiviaspam prevention@uni-tuebingen.de

tel: (+49) 7071 29 -72458

fax: (+49) 7071 29 -3332

room: 462 (second floor)

Maria T. Kristina Zaldivia studied Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Hons) at Monash University, Australia where she was also awarded her PhD in 2018. Her thesis, undertaken in the Atherothrombosis and Vascular Biology Laboratory at Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, explored the role of monocytes, platelets and platelet-derived microvesicles in hypertension and its cardiovascular consequences. Her study highlights the beneficial effect of regulating immune cells in hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. After her PhD, Maria joined the Feil Lab to study atherosclerosis, with focus on the role of transdifferentiated vascular smooth muscle cells in plaque progression and stability.