Uni-Tübingen

Nobel Prizes

The Nobel Prize has been awarded since 1901 and is considered the highest distinction in academia. It is given in the categories of Physics, Chemistry, Medicine, Literature, Economics, and for Peace.

These Nobel laureates have close ties with the University of Tübingen:

Medicine

1999
Günter Blobel

Günter Blobel (*1936) received the 1999 Nobel Prize for the discovery of signal peptides, a mechanism for cells to direct newly synthesized protein molecules to their proper location. He studied at the University of Tübingen, completing his doctorate here between 1958 and 1960.

1995
Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard

Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard (*1942) received the Nobel Prize in 1995 for her research on the genetic control of embryonic development. She studied at the University of Tübingen, completing her doctorate here between 1964 and 1973. She has been an honorary professor in Tübingen since 1991.

1991
Bert Sakmann

Bert Sakmann (*1942) received the Nobel Prize in 1991 for his discoveries regarding the function of single ion channels in cells. Sakmann completed some of his studies at the University of Tübingen.

Chemistry

1988
Hartmut Michel

Hartmut Michel (*1948) received the 1988 Nobel Prize for the determination of the three-dimensional structure of a photosynthetic reaction center in purple bacteria. Michel studied at the University of Tübingen from 1969 to 1974.

1979
Georg Wittig

The 1979 Nobel Prize went to Georg Wittig (1897-1987) for his development of the use of boron- and phosphorus-containing compounds into important reagents in organic synthesis. Wittig studied at the University of Tübingen from 1916 to 1920, and was a professor of Chemistry here between 1944 and 1956.

1939
Adolf Butenandt

Adolf Butenandt (1903-1995) received the Nobel Prize in 1939 for his research into sex hormones. Butenandt was head of Tübingen’s Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry and Professor of Physiological Chemistry at the University of Tübingen from 1945 to 1956.

1923
Fritz Pregl

Fritz Pregl (1869-1930) received the 1923 Prize for the invention of the method of micro-analysis of organic substances. Pregl studied in a number of locations, including the University of Tübingen in 1904.

1907
Eduard Buchner

Eduard Buchner (1860-1917) received the prize in 1907 for his biochemical research and his discovery of cell-free fermentation. Buchner was a professor of Chemistry at the University of Tübingen from 1896 to 1898.

1904
William Ramsay

William Ramsay (1852-1916) received the prize in 1904 for the discovery of the inert gaseous elements in air, and his determination of their place in the periodic system. Ramsay did some of his studies at the University of Tübingen and completed his doctorate here.

Physics

1967
Hans Bethe

Hans Bethe (1906-2005) received the 1967 Nobel Prize for his contributions to the theory of nuclear reactions, especially his discoveries concerning the energy production in stars. Bethe taught at the University of Tübingen 1932-33.

1909
Ferdinand Braun

The 1909 Nobel Prize went to Ferdinand Braun (1850-1918) in recognition of his contributions to the development of wireless telegraphy. Braun played a key role in the founding of Tübingen’s Institute of Physics.